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Women in fishing communities








Haque, F.; Tietze, U. Women in fishing communities. A special target group of development projects. Guidelines. Rome, FAO. 1988. 63p.


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    Book (stand-alone)
    Revolving loan funds and credit programme for fishing communities. Management guidelines. 1989
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    First published in English in 1989, several times reprinted and translated into French, Spanish and other languages because of public demand, the guidelines provide orientation and specific guidance to those concerned with the establishment and operation of revolving funds and credit programmes in small-scale fisheries. The guidelines promote the provision of institutional credit and savings facilities for small-scale fishing communities with a view of linking small-scale producers to the mainst ream of the national economy and of ultimately improving their standard of living.
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    Book (series)
    Livelihood and micro-enterprise development opportunities for women in coastal fishing communities in India – Case studies of Orissa and Maharashtra. 2007
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    The studies on livelihood and micro-enterprise development opportunities for women in coastal fishing communities in India are a follow-up to the national workshop on best practices in microfinance programmes for women in coastal fishing communities in India, held in Panaji, Goa, India, from 1 to 4 July 2003. The proceedings and outcomes of the workshop are reported in FAO Fisheries Report No. 724. The studies found that poverty has remained a serious problem in fishing communities in Orissa and Maharashtra, made even more severe by the widespread absence of rural infrastructure and services such as safe drinking water, electricity, waste and sewage disposal facilities, health care and educational services and facilities, all-weather link roads as well as a lack of adequate housing facilities. Over the last two decades, fishing effort and the cost of fishing have considerably increased. Over the same period, a diversification of livelihoods of fisherfolk households has taken place, and many household members, particularly women, are now working part-time as unskilled agricultural labourers or construction workers. In recent years, through the efforts of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the marine wing of the Fisheries Department of Orissa and the initiative of other government departments, many women self-help groups (SHGs) and cooperatives have been formed and training has been provided to their members in the field of fish processing an d marketing. Only a minority of the SHGs and cooperatives in Maharashtra and Orissa though, which have been formed in fishing communities, have so far been linked to financial institutions and there is a severe lack of rural fish storage and processing infrastructure and facilities. The findings of the studies suggest that through actively promoting self-help groups and cooperatives among women in coastal fishing communities and through linking these associations with financial insti tutions, investment and working capital needs of their members can be met. To make the best use of capital inputs, SHGs and their federations need vocational and enterprise development training from NGOs and from fisheries training and research institutions as well as assistance for establishing links to new market outlets for their products, both domestically and for export. The state-level workshops in Orissa and Maharashtra made specific recommendations as to what kind of assistance i s needed so that poverty in coastal fishing communities can be reduced and livelihoods improved and diversified through micro-enterprise development and microfinance and training support.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Income-earning Activities for Women from Fishing Communities in Sri Lanka - BOBP/REP/21 1985
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    This report describes two pilot activities in Sri Lanka meant to explore incomeearning opportunities for women from fishing communities. The activities relate to coir production in Ulhitiyawa, and sewing and tailoring in Mirissa. The report has been written up essentially as a case study of the two pilot activities, especially of the process of planning and implementation; It is not a complete record of the activities. The report concludes that the pilot activities have, on the whole, yielde d promising results. However, lack of management skills among women from fishing communities remains a major lacuna. The report, and the pilot activities it describes, have been organized by the smallscale fisheries project of the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP), in cooperation with several agencies: the Sri Lanka Mahila Samiti, a voluntary organization; the Women’s Bureau of the Ministry of Plan Implementation; and the Welfare Division of the Ministry of Fisheries.

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