Thumbnail Image

Coordinating pluralism in extension and advisory services










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Enabling entrepreneurship in extension and advisory services 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In the rapidly changing context of agri-food systems, extension and advisory services (EAS) are expected to provide new roles and services that go well beyond the traditional production-related technology transfer. Consequently, pluralistic EAS systems with diverse actors have emerged with diverse actors, including private and civil society organisations. These multiple EAS actors must adopt innovative entrepreneurship models if they are to act proactively and respond to the increasing diversity of farmers’ demands while staying independent and sustainable. Entrepreneurship in EAS means applying innovations such as creative and sustainable business models that can capture opportunities and new ideas, broaden the range of services and clients, and foster innovation in the agri-food system. It can strengthen autonomy (e.g. from donor funding), empower community-engaged providers that offer locally relevant services, create job opportunities, and strengthen resilience of EAS to shocks and disruptors. EAS entrepreneurs can include private agribusinesses, scalable start-ups, farmer champions and local volunteers, producer organisations and cooperatives, as well as public sector actors with innovative ideas who can network, create successful partnerships, and are result-oriented, willing to change and take risks. However, the development of appropriate EAS entrepreneurship models is conditioned by internal and external factors, like farmers’ demands, economic motivation, enabling and risk-mitigating policies and regulations, capacities and, perhaps most importantly, a profound mindset change of all the actors, moving towards sustainable and inclusive entrepreneurship and away from institutional silos, rigid public-only and big agribusiness-only schemes.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Transforming public agricultural extension and advisory service systems in smallholder farming
    Status quo, gaps, way forward
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Worldwide, extension and advisory service (EAS) systems have undergone reforms since the 1990s. However, the reforms of the last two decades in many countries have largely failed, as there has not been significant increase in accountability, efficiency, empowerment or impact. To fill this gap, this document, based on a systematic and extended literature review, delves into public EAS systems in developing countries, with a special focus on smallholder farming and institutional reforms. To begin with, it reviewed the status quo of global EAS systems in terms of institutional change and typologies and regional characteristics of EAS systems based on the analysis of 80 countries. This is followed by discussions on issues related to human resources, mandates, financial resources, infrastructure, and policy environment. The discussions are illustrated with six country case studies. Then, the document analyses the major challenges faced by institutional reforms in developing countries regarding accessibility, accountability, affordability, adaptability, sustainability, and coordination. Next, the document summarises the experience and lessons-learnt from EAS reforms across the developing countries. Finally, based on the previous discussions, it gives recommendations on strengthening and reforming public EAS systems.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Innovations in financing mechanisms for demand-driven agricultural advisory services
    Framework for analysis and synthesis of experiences
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The reform of extension systems towards pluralism and more demand drive over the past decades and the shift towards Agricultural Innovation Systems went along with changes in financing mechanisms. This report is part of a series of four case studies and a synthesis of these cases undertaken by the FAO Research and Extension Unit. The series documents innovative types of financing mechanisms for demand-led agricultural advisory systems and services in Denmark, Chile, Colombia and Senegal. This synthesis report was established with a conceptual framework for analysis used to develop a synthesis of the experiences from the four case studies. It highlights the changes that have occurred due to the different financing models and describes to what extent this has resulted in farmer empowerment and in more relevant, effective and sustainable services. The synthesis also supplements the cases with a literature review on other cases of similar financing mechanisms and draws overall conclusions and recommendations.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.