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A study of the trade in smoked-dried fish from West Africa to the United Kingdom.










Ward, A. A study of the trade in smoked-dried fish from West Africa to the United Kingdom. FAO Fisheries Circular. No. 981. Rome, FAO. 2003. 17p.


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    Improving livelihoods through exporting artisanally processed fish. 2005
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    A study was carried on the export of traditional African fishery products to “ethnic” markets in the European Union, United States and Canada. The study was conducted in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana and covered export plants, their suppliers, the competent authorities for sanitary certification, the fisheries departments, export promotion councils, and other stakeholders. The main export-oriented traditional fish products identified were smoke-dried fish and shrimps, sun-dried fish and live crab s. In both countries the socio-economic importance of traditional fish processing and export operations is considerably higher than indicated by official statistics, contributing to incomes of artisanal fishermen and women fish processors, incomes of small-scale fish exporters, employment, and foreign exchange earnings. Also the contribution to responsible fisheries was underestimated. There are indications of unsatisfied demand but further growth of the sub-sector would depend on overcomi ng certain weaknesses identified by the study, such as weaknesses of competent authorities in effectively enforcing regulations, limited knowledge by operators of the sanitary regulations, misuse in some cases of registration numbers and inclusion of products from non-registered producers in consignments from registered ones, police harassments, low awareness among authorities of the importance of the trade, and lack of organization within the sub-sector. Also, the design of the facilities and o f the smoking operations themselves seemed rather wasteful of fuel wood. As a direct result of the study, authorities already committed themselves in reviewing the certification process in order to address its cumbersomeness and match the quality assurance systems with the rationale and systematic approach within the global sanitary concept; to deploy staff to exit points; and to improve relations with operators and providing them more advisory services.
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    Regional fish trade in Eastern and Southern Africa: products and markets. A Fish Traders Guide 2012
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    Fish Trade is a major commodity exchange that makes fish to be the cheapest source of animal protein in Eastern and Southern Africa, particularly within the Great Lakes Region. The countries within the Eastern and Southern Africa and Indian Ocean (ESA-IO) Region agreed to a common strategy to increase the level of social, economic and environmental development and deepen regional integration through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. The Program for Implementation of a Regional Fisheries Strategy (IRFS Program) for ESA-IO was launched in February 2011 with Regional Fisheries Trade as one of the five components. The other four components are Fisheries governance, Fisheries management, Monitoring, Control and Surveillance and Food Security. IRFS Program is coordinated by the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) on behalf of the Member States within the ESA-IO region. Fish trade across borders or frontiers is an old profession in Africa, which was done to facilitate distant com munities to access fish, which was mainly in smoked and sundried/salted form. Trade in East and Southern Africa has increased to cover countries within and outside the region, providing the population with access to fish preserved and processed through industrial and artisanal methods. The range of products has also expanded to include chilled, frozen, and canned fishery products in addition to fresh, salted, sundried, smoked and deep-fried products. The market outlets have also grown from the s olitary fish monger to specialised agents, specialised fish shops, retail stores and supermarkets, restaurants and hotels. The consumers’ demand for better quality products brings on board the quality and safety issue prompting the countries to establish Sanitary and Phytosanitary standards for fish and fishery products. Harmonising trade measures provides a freer market for Fish Traders within the same trade or economic bloc. It also provides opportunities for bilateral arrangements between nei ghbouring countries in dissimilar trade blocs. The conditions under which the regional fish trade operates vary from countries with moderate infrastructure, established measures, well packaged and labelled consignments to those with rudimentary facilities, inadequate measures, and poorly transacted business with high Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fish trade. The Fish Traders Guide primarily focuses on freshwater fishes from the Great Lakes region. It provides information on the various asp ects of the different fish types or species, fishery products and markets to enable the fish trader to plan and make informed decision. The guide encourages the trader to conduct legal trade and seek technical advice from relevant authorities. It also provides tips on qualities of a successful fish trader and successful business. The guide is neither a legal document nor an instruction material. However, it is a sensitisation instrument to promote responsible fish trading practices. It is IOC ai m to promote wise-use of the fisheries resources, increase in per capita fish consumption and increased accessibility of fish and fishery products by the population within the ESA-IO region. Responsible fish trading practices adhere to the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, which is central to the sustainability of fisheries resources. Good trading practices discourage illegal fishing methods and promote optimal utilisation of the catches through value addition, improved processing a nd reduction of post-harvest losses.
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    Regional Training Workshop on Improved Fish Smoking Using The Thyarore System. Tanzania
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The Indian Ocean Commission through the SmartFish programme, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), is implementing a regional fisheries strategy programme aimed at improving the sustainable regional supply of fish and fishery products. The programme has five different result areas, the fifth one being food security, which primarily focuses on the implementation of activities geared at reducing post-harvest fish losses that occur in small-scale f isheries. Regarding post-harvest fish loss reduction, the approach of SmartFish is to build on what has already been done in the region. More specifically, to build the capacity of various key institutions in the region in terms of a systematic application of fish loss assessment methodologies in small-scale fisheries as a precondition for rational intervention, and indeed to find practical ways to reduce such losses. In line with the above, the Fisheries Education and Training Agency (FETA), in collaboration with FAO-SmartFish, organized a regional training workshop on improved fish smoking using the Thyarore system, which was held in Mwanza, Tanzania, from 04 – 08 November 2013. Seventeen participants from Kenya, Burundi, Rwanda, United Republic of Tanzania, and Uganda took part in the training. Participants were Fisheries Officers from the respective countries. The competency-based training programme had two main learning outcomes: participants are able to design and construct a Thy arore system oven/kiln; participants are able to smoke fish using the Thyarore system. The training was conducted by experienced experts from FETA and Senegal who employed a variety of hands-on type training methods and practical sessions. The pre- and post-evaluation suggested that the teaching-learning process was appreciated. Likewise, the participants’ perception of the training was generally high and observations from the post training evaluation indicated that many are now planning to intr oduce FAO-Thyarore Technology systems in their respective countries.

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