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Demand for products of irrigated agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa













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    Book (series)
    The State of Food and Agriculture, 2000
    Lessons from the past 50 years
    2000
    The State of Food and Agriculture 2000 reports only very modest growth in world agricultural production in 1998, and the estimates for 1999 do not appear to indicate any improvement. Particularly for the developing countries, where the performance of the agricultural sector is of special concern, prospects for 1999 are for a noticeable slowdown in crop and livestock production - reflecting a negative trend that is now in its third consecutive year. It has been a difficult period for many of thes e countries, which have been facing unusually adverse climatic conditions, together with the negative economic impact of the financial crisis that erupted in 1997, declining prices of several of their major commodity exports and, in a number of cases, political instability and conflicts. Food supply disruptions associated with these problems have led to the outbreak or persistence of serious food emergency situations in a large number of countries - currently more than 30 - around the world. The close of a millennium is an opportune time for studying the past with a view to seeking lessons for the future. In its special chapter, "World food and agriculture: lessons from the past 50 years", The State of Food and Agriculture 2000 reflects on humankind's achievements and failures in fighting poverty and hunger over the past half-century - a theme that stimulates both historic and prospective thought.
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    Rice value chain in Ghana – Prospective analysis and strategies for sustainable and pro-poor growth 2021
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    Based on past experience of partnership on support to National Rice Development Strategies (NRDS) within Coalition for African Rice Development (CARD), AfricaRice and FAO decided to conduct a series of rice policy reviews for Ghana, Ivory Coast and Mali in 2019. The following study uses the Ex-ante Carbon-balance Value Chain tool (EX-ACT VC), developed in 2016 by FAO, to assess the Ghanaian rice value chain’s environmental (in terms of climate mitigation and climate resilience) and socio-economic impact for a business as usual scenario in 2020 compared to a growth scenario for 2030. Promotion of good agricultural practices (GAP), the reduction of crop losses, and an increase in the use of inputs and mechanization are the different strategies considered in this study that would help in realizing the aim of self-sufficiency. Through the implementation of these practices, along with the expansion of rice growing areas, the income per day of work per farmer would increase by more than USD 4, reaching approx. USD 9/day of work in the value chain. The gross production value of the rice value chain would reach USD 856 million, which is an additional USD 511 million in gross production value by 2030. An upgraded rice value chain would also result in an increase in the value added by USD 378 million by 2030 with an overall positive carbon balance that would emit 284 852 tCO2-e of greenhouse gas emissions.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Food Outlook, June 2006 2006
    The recent months saw commodity markets as a whole becoming more volatile with a steady upward trend in prices. In agricultural markets, some important food and feed commodities gained on supply tightness and stronger demand while in the energy complex and metals, the tighter supply and demand balance resulted in a steep increase in prices. Amid political uncertainties and surging energy prices, agricultural markets over the past year have also had to confront abnormal incidences of natural disa sters, ranging from devastating hurricanes to fast spreading animal diseases. Based on current indications, several agricultural commodities are likely to experience still more unstable months ahead and, in most instances, the fundamentals point to even further gains in prices. This eventuality seems strongest for cereals, as world cereal demand is forecast to surpass its supply in the new season and push down stocks to an uncomfortably low level. For sugar, while a further surge in prices from the current high levels could be considered as less probable, the main risk remains the continuing price volatility. For the oilseed complex, as well as meat and dairy, fundamentals at this point in time do not support a tightening in the markets and the near-term price prospects are more on the downside instead. Against this background of mixed outlook but generally firm prices, FAO is forecasting an increase of over 2 percent in the world food import bill in 2006 compared to 2005. The increase is expected to be strongest for cereals and sugar but smallest for meat. Given their higher share as importers of food and feed, the developing countries’ bill is forecast to grow by 3.5 percent while that of the Low Income Food Deficit Countries is forecast to jump by nearly 7 percent.

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