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Sectoral performance of water management in plantations-based industry

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022










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    How Brazilian Tree Industry can help complying with climate change agenda linked to Sustainable Development Goals, Global Forest Goals and Brazilian NDC under Paris Agreement
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The Brazilian Tree Industry (Ibá) is the association responsible for institutionally representing the planted tree production chain with its main stakeholders. Ibá represents 50 companies and 9 state entities for products originating from planted trees, most notably wood panels, laminate flooring, pulp, paper, charcoal steel industry and biomass, as well as independent producers and financial investors which together contribute with 7% of Brazil’s industrial Gross Domestic Product. The sector holds 9 million hectares of planted trees and 5.9 million hectares for conservation.
    The Brazilian NDC aiming at reducing GHG emissions in 37%by 2025 and 43% by 2030. Such an ambitious goal will demand, according to the Government, the restoration of 12 million hectares of forest, achieve zero illegal deforestation in Amazonia, attain 45% of renewable energy and 18% of bioenergy and ensure compliance with the Forest Code.
    This industry has a substantial contribution to several Global Forest Goals of UNFF and SDGs from Agenda 2030, in terms of adaptation and mitigation of climate change. Regardless the goal and governance related, both in national or international level, Brazilian planted-tree sector plays an important role and this paper aims to show how.
    As a brief the sector is now monitoring dozens and reporting 17 KPIs on water management; 89% of the energy is renewable and 67% is produced in-house; 67% of paper is recycled, 4.48 billion tons of CO2e is stored in almost 15 million hectares of forests for commercial and conservation purposes. At steel industry, each ton of pig iron produced with charcoal coming from planted forest as a substitution from coal, avoids the issue of 1.8 ton CO2eq. At civil construction, the use of wood stocks 0.5 on of CO2e per square meter of construction, compared to the use of conventional materials. The carbon removed from atmosphere is fixed in the biomass that will become products and can store from 45% up to 85% of the mass products. Keywords: Climate change, Adaptive and integrated management, Economic Development ID: 3487149
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    Brazilian planted trees industry and biodiversity: A case of success
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Brazil is home to the greatest biodiversity on the planet. Around 20% of the world's biodiversity is found here due to territorial extension, its distinct biomes and favorable climate and soil conditions. One of the great allies of environmental conservation is the Brazilian forestry sector, which believes that the solution for the conservation of biodiversity must be aligned with economic development projects.
    The trees planted by the Brazilian forest sector are mainly found in previously degraded areas and integrated with natural forests in mosaic planting, creating ecological corridors that contribute to the conservation of biodiversity and serve as habitat for animals, plants and microorganisms.
    In order to demonstrate the sector's commitment to conservation of biodiversity The Brazilian Tree Industry (Ibá) gathered information about their associated companies’ projects and monitoring data. These initiatives date back to the early 1970s and it is notorious that this practice has intensified in recent years by the incresead awareness of the topic relevance by the companies, governments and society.
    The Brazilian forestry sector has six million hectares of protected natural areas and nine hectares of commercial plantations, which represents less than 2% of the Brazilian territory. The area occupied by the forestry sector, both for planting and for conservation purposes, has positive indexes of biodiversity. The forest companies provide shelter for more than 5790 species of fauna and flora in five different biomes (Amazon, Caatinga, Cerrado, Atlantic Forest and Pampa). Regarding threatened species, for example, 38% of mammals and 45% of birds are found in these areas.
    This are some few numbers found in biodiversity monitoring reinforcing the commitment of the Brazilian planted tree sector, and brings the idea that conserving the environmental and productivity is alighted. Keywords: Monitoring and data collection, Biodiversity , onservation, Sustainable forest management, Research, Knowledge management ID: 3479062
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    Article
    Land use and land use changes by the farmers from mulberry (Morus alba) plantations to green forest tree based farming for income growth and sustainability in Malda district of India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Malda district was famous for two economic activities viz. Mango (Mangifera indica) cultivation and rearing mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori). Earlier silkworm rearing was a flourishing cottage industry and every households of Kaliachak block reared silkworm for cocoon production. It was the major livelihood of rural farmers but they suffered heavily due to cheap import of silk from China. Thus, the backbone of farmers was crippled, hence they started cultivating various trees in mulberry fields along with agricultural crops for sustaining their livelihood. Present study was undertaken to know how farmers adjusted to new situation, their knowledge about trees, income growth and sustainability. It was observed that mulberry was raised as herb and leaves were fed to the silkworm larvae at home. Traditionally farmers planted Dalbergia sissoo trees on the border of mulberry fields but later on they started planting other trees. A few farmers uprooted their mulberry bushes and converted to Swietenia macrophylla plantation. Some farmers converted their entire land to Mango and Litchi chinensis orchards for long term gains. Besides, some traditional farmers, around 10% still continued with silkworm rearing for their livelihood security but planted few rows of trees like Tectona grandis, D.sissoo, Bombax ceiba, S.macrophylla and Acacia auriculiformis. Few big farmers converted their mulberry fields into ponds for fishery, however, planted Mango and Sissoo on border. The first crops inside the tree plantations were Maize, Papaya and Vegetables which gave farmers quick income. Later, Banana and Citrus were planted. These activities are still continuing, but timber harvesting has also started which will give high returns. These forest tree based land changes not only provided sustainable income growth to farmers, but also made them drought resilient leading to climate change mitigation and adaptation besides conserving plant biodiversity. Key words: Landscape management, Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation ID: 3475637

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