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Cash transfers and women's economic inclusion

Evidence from Zambia










Viberti, F., Daidone, S., Pace, N. and Sitko, N. 2022. Cash transfers and women's economic inclusion Evidence from Zambia: Policy brief. Rome, FAO. 



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    Cash transfers and women's economic inclusion
    Experimental evidence from Zambia
    2021
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    This paper investigates whether an increase in exogenous income through the Child Grants model of the Social Cash Transfer programme in Zambia fosters economic inclusion among rural women. We conceptualize economic inclusion as a transformative process comprised of four pillars: productive capacity, financial inclusion, social power, and psychological assets. Using experimental data, we find strong evidence of direct impacts of the Child Grant on the productive capacity, financial inclusion, and psychological assets of rural women. In addition to these direct impacts, we implement a mediation analysis to explore the potential mediating role of psychological assets in affecting the other pillars of economic inclusion. Through this approach, we find indicative evidence of indirect and mutually reinforcing relationships between changes in psychological assets brought about through the Child Grant and improvements in the productive capacity and financial inclusion of beneficiaries. Such results suggest that cash transfers might be effective in promoting women’s economic inclusion, both through the direct monetary effect and through the mediated effect of psychological assets.
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    The household- and individual-level economic impacts of cash transfer programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa 2017
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    This report synthesizes the analysis and findings of a set of seven country impact evaluation studies that explore the impact of cash transfer programmes on household economic decision-making, productive activities and labour allocation in sub-Saharan Africa. The seven countries are Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Results from seven recently completed rigorous impact evaluations of government-run unconditional social cash transfer programmes in sub-Saharan Africa s how that these programmes have significant positive impacts on the livelihoods of beneficiary households. In Zambia, the Child Grant programme had large and positive impacts across an array of income generating activities. The impact of the programmes in Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi and Zimbabwe were more selective in nature, while the Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty programme in Ghana had fewer direct impacts on productive activities, and more on various dimensions of risk management .
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    Cash transfer programmes for managing climate risk: evidence from a randomized experiment in Zambia 2017
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    Cash transfer programmes are increasingly being used to combat poverty and hunger as well as to shape the human capital of future generations. Even though most of these programmes are not explicitly designed to help households manage climate risk, there are good reasons to expect that cash transfers can help build household resilience against climatic risk. This study aims to provide an empirical analysis of the effect of weather risk on the welfare of rural households using impact evaluation da ta from the Zambia Child Grant Programme (CGP), together with a set of novel weather variation indicators.

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