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Monitoring and managing queen conch fisheries: a manual.








Medley, P. Monitoring and managing queen conch fisheries: a manual. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 514. Rome, FAO. 2008. ...p.


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    Manual for the monitoring and management of queen conch 2005
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    The Caribbean queen conch Strombus gigas is listed on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). A listing on Appendix II requires that any specimen of the species included in Appendix II can only be exported if a permit has been issued to allow the export. Further, CITES states that export permits should only be issued when the responsible authority has deemed that the export will not be detrimental to the survival of that species . This manual presents guidelines on the requirements for responsible management of the fisheries exploiting queen conch, with particular emphasis on the requirements to comply with the relevant CITES regulations. The manual describes the basic fisheries management cycle which includes: development and interpretation of policy; the need for management controls to regulate fishing activities; data collection and analysis; decision-making; enforcement of and compliance with the management controls ; and regular feedback and review of the management system. It provides general guidance on each of those steps for the queen conch fisheries of the Caribbean. It also provides two case studies of management systems currently being applied: the Turks and Caicos Islands and Jamaica.
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    Report of the Regional Workshop on the Monitoring and Management of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas. Kingston, Jamaica, 1–5 May 2006. 2007
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    This document contains the report of the Regional Workshop on the Monitoring and Management of Queen Conch, Strombus gigas, held in Kingston, Jamaica, from 1 to 5 May 2006. The purpose of the workshop was to assist Caribbean countries in the development of effective management plans for queen conch fisheries and, consequently, to improve their capacity to implement regulations and obligations under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CIT ES) and the Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) of the regional Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (Cartagena Convention). The workshop addressed issues related to: policies and legislation; management objectives, indicators and reference points; management controls; and enforcement and compliance. These issues were addressed at the national level, through the preparation of Draft Fisheri es Management Plans by the participating countries, and at regional level through working groups formed during the workshop. Results from the workshop led to recommendations aimed at improving queen conch fisheries management at national and regional level.
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    Conversion factors for processed queen conch to nominal weight/ Factores de conversión para el caracol reina procesado a peso nominal 2009
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    Queen conch (Strombus gigas) is one of the important fishery resources in the Caribbean in terms of its annual landings and its social and economic importance. Queen conch is an edible marine gastropod of the Caribbean region that has been listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which allows international trade of the species only after certain conditions are met. An FAO FishCode STF*/OSPESCA** workshop held in Panama identified the need to be able to convert the different processing grades to nominal weight. Three countries (Dominican Republic, Honduras and Nicaragua) volunteered to participate in a field experiment to establish the conversion factors. This investigation resulted in the establishment of conversion rates for different processing grades per country. There were slight but significant differences between conversion factors for processing grades between countries, most likely related to different processing techniques used. Within this limitation, the following preliminary regional conversion factors are recommended: 100 percent fillet to nominal weight 16.4; 85 percent fillet to nominal weight 13.7; 50 percent fillet to nominal weight 9.46; dirty meat to nominal weight 5.7.

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