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Livestock in a Changing Landscape: Social Consequences for Mixed Crop-Livestock Production Systems in Developing Countries

Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock









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    Dairy Development Programs: Benefits and Risks for Smallholders - The Case of Andhra Pradesh, India 2006
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    Andhra Pradesh is one of the agriculturally most advanced states in India but still has high levels of rural poverty. Mixed croplivestock farming is the predominant farming system practiced by over 80 percent of rural households in the state. Bovines account for about 40 percent of the livestock population and milk is one of the most important products of cattle and buffalo enterprises, contributing over half of the value of total livestock output of the state. Andhra Pradesh’s milk is produced by 5 million dairy farmers, most of which own less than 2 hectares and 1 to 4 dairy animals.
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    Business and livelihoods in african livestock
    Investments to overcome information gaps
    2014
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    Poverty is widespread in Africa, but the continent is fast growing, with the consumption of animal protein skyrocketing, in particular for relatively low-value, low-processed livestock products. Meanwhile, in rural areas, the majority of households are livestock keepers, many of whom are poor. This growth in demand for animal protein can provide major business opportunities for livestock producers, with implications for poverty reduction. While there is heterogeneity among livestock keepers, clustering them into homogenous groups is useful to guide policy and investment decisions that stimulate a market-driven and inclusive growth of the sector. A small share of livestock keepers, from between 5 to 20 percent, depending on the country, can be considered business-oriented with incentives to expand their livestock production and tap into the growing market for animal protein. These keep relative large herds and derive a significant share of their cash income from accessing and utilizing livestock markets. The remainder of livestock keepers can be defined as livelihood-oriented: they keep animals more for the many livelihoods services they provide — such as insurance, manure and hauling services — than for selling meat, milk and other livestock products to the market. The reason is simple: on average, they keep 1.60 Tropical Livestock Units (TLUs), which is equivalent to about three beef cattle per household or about 0.6 TLU per household me mber, and, therefore, they cannot derive large benefits from regularly selling their surplus production to the market.
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    Integrated Crop Management Vol.7-2010 - Enhancing Crop-Livestock Systems in Conservation Agriculture for Sustainable Production Intensification
    A Farmer Discovery Process Going to Scale in Burkina Faso
    2010
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    This is a story about how FAO assisted groups of farmers in five farming communities in the moist savanna zone of South Western Burkina Faso to enhance their crop-livestock systems through Conservation Agriculture (CA) practices, including crop diversification, using an innovative farmer discovery process, to bring about agricultural intensification and improvement in livelihoods. FAO’s assistance was delivered largely by working with national institutions, adding value to ongoing stakeholder resources and activities. It is a story of positive intensification outcomes brought about by adapting ‘proven principles and practices’ of CA and crop diversification into existing crop-livestock systems. FAO worked with a range of stakeholders including the farmers and their communities, and the research and extension stakeholders, to create convergence and enable a farmer-based discovery process to experiment with a set of fundamentally new principles and elements in their farming practices for integrated crop-livestock production intensification. The positive outcomes offer a real promise and an opportunity for bringing about a large scale impact on agricultural productivity and livelihoods in the moist savanna zone of West Africa, often referred to as the potential ‘bread basket’ because of the zone’s high productivity potential for integrated crop-livestock production. The conceptual elements draw substantially from new innovations in sus tainable intensification in similar agroecologies in the savannas of Brazil. This publication describes the multi-stakeholder process which led the successful outcomes, and the opportunity for a greater change that now exists and should be harnessed for sustainable agricultural development, nationally and regionally.

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