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Building stronger partnerships for resilience

Opportunities for greater FAO engagement in realizing the goals of the DFID Humanitarian Policy










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Saving livelihoods saves lives 2018 2019
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    In recent years, the number of people experiencing acute hunger has been persistently high. And 2018 was no exception. Some 113 million people in 53 countries were acutely hungry last year. That is 113 million girls, boys, men and women, old and young, who were unable to access enough food and required humanitarian assistance to meet their most basic needs. For FAO, building resilient agriculture-based livelihoods and food systems is at the core of efforts to fight acute hunger and avert food crises. We know how critical humanitarian assistance is. At the same time, it is clear that humanitarian assistance on its own is not enough to win the battle against acute hunger. That is why FAO’s humanitarian work is firmly embedded within a foundation of resilience building. And this was really demonstrated in 2018, when the breadth of our work extended from immediate humanitarian response to protect lives and livelihoods in some of the most complex contexts in the world, including South Sudan and Yemen, to addressing the vulnerability of pastoral populations and facilitating the development of livestock feed balances in the Horn of Africa, to supporting disaster risk reduction efforts from Myanmar to Central America. Publications such as this offer us an opportunity to reflect on some of our achievements over the past year and identify how we can do better in the next. It is not intended as an exhaustive list of the work done under FAO’s strategic programme on resilience, but rather a snapshot to demonstrate what we can achieve and how much more this to be done.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO's role in humanitarian contexts
    Saving lives through stronger, more resilient livelihoods in 2018
    2018
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    After decades of progress, hunger is on the rise again. The figures from The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2017 report show an increase in the absolute number of people affected by chronic hunger and a rise in the global prevalence of undernourishment. Globally, the number of chronically malnourished people is estimated to have increased to 815 million from 777 million in 2015. In 2017, four countries faced a very real threat of famine and many more saw increasing numbers of people facing severe hunger. Protecting livelihoods by providing emergency agricultural assistance from the onset of a crisis is crucial to save lives, while enabling people to produce food and earn an income. Rapid and efficient response to agricultural threats and emergencies saves lives, promotes recovery and reduces the gap between dependency on food assistance and self-reliance. FAO helps people to: • anticipate, prepare for and prevent crises • respond quickly and effectively when disaster does strike • invest in stronger recovery and resilient livelihoods
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    Document
    Somalia Situation Report – May 2017 2017
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    Poor rains and extended drought over consecutive growing seasons have impacted rural livelihoods and food security in Somalia, pushing the country to the brink of famine. This just five years after the 2011 crisis that claimed the lives of over a quarter million people and as the Somali people continue to rebuild from decades of internal conflict. Some 6.7 million people now face acute food insecurity (IPC phases 2, 3 & 4), with the majority – 68 percent – of severely food insecure (IPC phases 3 & 4) in rural areas (2.2 million). Rural areas are home to nine in ten people at greatest risk – those on the brink of famine (IPC 4). Following early warning in February a quick response by donors, the humanitarian community and the Somali government and people, the worst has so far been averted via a combination of interventions – including cash transfers and livelihood support delivered by FAO at massive scale. April-June rains are critical to Somalia’s main Gu growing season and help rejuve nate rangelands. While they have now started, they started late and rainfall has been below average in many places. Meanwhile, displacement, disease (a severe outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea/cholera) and compounding needs are contributing to a further deterioration in food security.

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