Thumbnail Image

ANNUAL REPORT 2016 of the SUBREGIONAL OFFICE FOR EASTERN AFRICA










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Enhance the Preparedness and Response Capacity of the Countries of the Sub-Regional Office for Eastern Africa to the Mango Mealybug (Rastrococcus Invadens Williams) (Phase 1) - TCP/SFE/3801 2023
    Also available in:

    The global and regional spread of plant pests and diseases has increased dramatically in recent years, threatening the food security and sustainable development of the Eastern African subregion This is the result of globalization, trade and climate change, as well as reduced resilience in food production systems due to decades of agricultural intensification If insufficient natural enemies or appropriate control measures are introduced, plant pests can easily spread over vast areas and reach epidemic proportions, causing significant losses to crops, pastures and forests, in turn endangering the livelihoods of vulnerable farmers, pastoralists and the food and nutrition security of millions of people Accidently introduced in Western Africa, the mango mealybug Rastrococcus invadens Williams Hemiptera Pseudoco ccidae represents a significant risk for the whole region, as its reach has been recorded in Central and Eastern Africa, with the first infected plants found in Rwanda Mango mealybug damage is caused by the accumulation of honeydew and sooty mould that impedes the photosynthetic capacity of the plant Heavily impacted plant parts stop growing, while in many cases no new leaves or flowers can be produced In severely affected areas, mango production was reduced by 89 100 percent.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Pastoralism in Africa’s drylands
    Reducing risks, addressing vulnerability and enhancing resilience
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Pastoral livestock production is crucial to the livelihoods and the economy of Africa’s semiarid regions. It developed 7,000 years ago in response to long-tern climate change. It spread throughout Northern Africa as an adaptation to the rapidly changing and increasingly unpredictable arid climate. It is practiced in an area representing 43% of Africa’s land mass in the different regions of Africa, and in some regions it represents the dominant livelihoods system. It covers 36 countries, stretching from the Sahelian West to the rangelands of Eastern Africa and the Horn and the nomadic populations of Southern Africa, with an estimate of 268 million pastoralists. The mobility of pastoralists exploiting the animal feed resources along different ecological zones represents a flexible response to a dry and increasingly variable environment. It allows pastoral herds to use the drier areas during the wet season and more humid areas during the dry season. It ensures pastoral livestock to access sufficient high-quality grazing and create economic value. The objectives of this report are to investigate the current situation of pastoralism and the vulnerability context in which pastoralism currently functions and to outline the policy, resilience programming, and research areas of intervention to enhance the resilience of pastoral livelihoods systems. Scholarly views of pastoralism’s ecological impact have grown more positive since the early 1990s, when a new understanding of dryland dynamics led to the so-called new rangeland paradigm. The new rangeland paradigm represents a shift in the wider discourse on pastoralism from the earlier debates based on the “tragedy of the commons.” The new rangeland paradigm has provided a more comprehensive understanding of the drylands and shown that mobility is an appropriate strategy to exploit the natural resource base in these areas. In recent decades, the adaptability and mobility of pastoralism in relation to resource variability have been undermined by factors that are embedded in the institutional environment and policy that shape the vulnerability context of pastoralism. The report analyzes five factors that undermine the pastoral livelihoods resilience and the implications of these factors for the viability of pastoralism. On the basis of the analysis of vulnerability contexts that shape pastoralism, the report identifies interventions for increasing pastoral resilience.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Promoting nutrition-sensitive agricultural diversification in Eastern Africa - GCP/SFE/001/MUL 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Africa is the world’s youngest continent, with more than half of the population under25 years of age. Unleashing the capacity of young women and men to effectivelyparticipate in the modernization of the agricultural sector is imperative for enhancedresilience, improved food security and poverty reduction. Rural youth employmenthas been identified as a major national and regional priority in Eastern Africa.Aquaculture and poultry production are agricultural areas with the potential to boostnutritious food production, livelihood diversification and income generation.Sustainable, integrated and innovative practices to enhance youth entrepreneurshipwere needed, as well as supporting mechanisms to enable farmers to producenutrient-dense foods for schoolchildren, the community at large and domestic andregional markets. Against this background, the project aimed to promote greaterdiversity and intensification of the poultry and aquaculture value chains, to improvenutrition and offer better job prospects for young people in four recipient countriesin Eastern Africa: Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. Lessons learned and goodpractices derived from the four baby projects were shared with other countries in thesubregion: Djibouti, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Somalia and United Republic of Tanzania.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.