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FAO - Nutrition country profiles: Fiji 2003








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    Book (stand-alone)
    The role of diets and food systems in the prevention of obesity and non-communicable diseases in Fiji
    Gathering evidence and supporting multi-stakeholder engagement
    2021
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    Despite the lack of literature and inconsistencies in research aims and methods, it is evident that dietary intake has been shifting from traditional food consumption patterns to diets that are heavily reliant on imported and increasingly processed foods in Fiji. Availability of food items varies depending on location, however there is evidence of food environments with high availability of energy dense, nutrient poor foods, in both rural and urban locations. Food environments around vulnerable populations, for example schools, are of concern, with 80 percent of the outlets surveyed within 400 m school zones selling sugar-sweetened beverages. While the process of developing policies that support a healthy diet is enabled by Fiji’s whole-of-government commitment to improving food nutrition security, there are competing priorities and points of incoherence that deter this, particularly relating to economic growth. A range of specific policy measures have been introduced in Fiji by different government sectors that influence all facets of the food system. However, capacities required to develop and deliver policies are limited across government, primarily by the allocation of resources and technical expertise. This reduces the effectiveness of existing policy measures to support healthy diets, and the progression of new measures. A range of gaps and opportunities exist among the policy measures identified, and entry points lie throughout the food system and associated policy environment to improve dietary behaviour in Fiji.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Let's Go Local - Guidelines for Promoting Pacific Island Food 2011
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    Over the past decades, food and dietary patterns in Pacific Island Countries have undergone significant changes. Traditional diets consisting of fresh fish, root crops, breadfruit and local fruits and vegetables have been increasingly replaced by imported, often highly processed foods such as white rice, flour, instant noodles, canned foods, fatty low grade meats and soft drinks with a high sugar content. At the same time, a more sedentary lifestyle is becoming common among many Pacific Islander s As a result, Pacific Island Countries now face a wave of dietary and lifestyle-related health problems. Chronic non-communicable diseases including diabetes, heart disease and cancer are now the main causes of death, illness and disability among adults in the Pacific Island Countries. Furthermore, countries are burdened by micro-nutrient deficiencies related to a lack of essential vitamins and minerals in the diet, such as vitamin A deficiency and anaemia. There is evidence that the tradit ional diet, lifestyles and food systems of the Pacific protected people in the past against these health problems. Food composition data provides scientific evidence of the rich nutrient content and health benefits of the traditional foods, including breadfruit, banana, taro, yam, cassava and sweet potato, as well as coconut, fish and seafood, and various fruits and vegetables.
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    Document
    Food, Nutrition and Agriculture 2001
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    In many parts of the world, people are changing their lifestyles as, moving to urban areas, they adopt new diets and more sedentary behaviour patterns. Because energy intakes exceed energy expenditures, for some people obesity is becoming more common. Obesity is associated with serious chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer. For poor communities and countries, the prevalence of both obesity and undernutrition within the same population can make improvi ng nutrition and health even more complex. In this issue of Food, Nutrition and Agriculture, two articles discuss the relationships between social and economic change and obesity. Preventing obesity and other nutritional problems requires mass education. A third article describes strategies that nutritionists in developing countries use for developing food-based dietary guidelines.

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