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A snapshot of the status and way forward for transforming agrifood systems in the Pacific

Identifying entry points and analysing trade-offs for policymakers









FAO. 2023. A snapshot of the status and way forward for transforming agrifood systems in the Pacific – Identifying entry points and analysing trade-offs for policymakers. Apia.







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    Booklet
    Harnessing the potential of the 10 Elements of Agroecology to facilitate agrifood systems transformation
    From visual narratives to integrated policy design
    2023
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    Visual narratives using the 10 Elements of Agroecology can guide the holistic visioning needed to better understand transformative change and plausible transitions towards sustainable agriculture and food systems. By sharing similar underlying storylines, assumptions and responses to drivers of change, visual narratives may foster the convergence of transitions into typologies that can facilitate the design of response options to face complex sustainability challenges. This policy paper outlines how nexus analyses and visual narratives using the 10 Elements of Agroecology provide a framework for policymakers and stakeholders, including producers and their organizations, researchers, civil society and the private sector, to identify key entry points and plausible trajectories of change for agricultural and food systems transformation. By revealing interdependencies, synergies and trade-offs, visual narratives can facilitate the design of integrated and transformative policy packages. This document aims to provide policymakers and stakeholders with guidance and illustrative examples to identify, co-design and combine the most effective policies to unlock transformation in the socio-ecological and political contexts in which they are operating. Nevertheless, it does not intend to be prescriptive and should be tailored to specific circumstances, national legislation and the unique needs of each food system, following the best judgement of each policymaker and stakeholder involved.
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    Booklet
    Climate-Smart Agriculture in Cabo Verde 2019
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    The climate smart agriculture (CSA) concept reflects an ambition to improve the integration of agriculture development and climate responsiveness. It aims to achieve food security and broader development goals under a changing climate and increasing food demand. CSA initiatives sustainably increase productivity, enhance resilience, and reduce/remove greenhouse gases (GHGs), and require planning to address trade-offs and synergies between three pillars: productivity, adaptation and mitigation. The priorities of different countries and stakeholders are reflected to achieve more efficient, effective, and equitable food systems that address challenges in environment, social, and economic dimensions across productive landscapes. The country profile provides a snapshot of a developing baseline created to initiate discussion, both within countries and globally, about entry points for investing in CSA at scale. Cabo Verde is an archipelago developing country in West Africa of volcanic origin having an ecological and landscape diversity associated to the geomorphological characteristics of the islands and to the influences of the actions of climate elements and anthropic pressure on the existing resources. Agricultural land in the country is about 79000ha representing 19.6% of the total land area. Agriculture is predominantly based on subsistence family production. The production systems present can be categorised into rainfed and irrigated systems. Major crops produced include maize, pulses, vegetables, coconut, sugar cane, coffee and fruits. In terms of agricultural inputs, Cabo Verde has an irrigation potential of 3,109ha although a small proportion (5.9%) of the agricultural areas is equipped for irrigation. However, drip irrigation has expanded fast, with investments made in water mobilisation and gravity irrigation schemes. Cereals continue to constitute the major parts of Cabo Verdean diet although diets are now more diversified with more proteins and micronutrients-rich foods. As a small island development state (SIDS), Cabo Verde has one of the lowest GHG emissions per capita. Challenges to agriculture include (i) growth in population and food demand, (ii) limited marketing opportunities of agricultural commodities, (iii) climate change and variability, and (iv) food waste. Climate models ran during 2008-2012 have shown that the country’s natural vulnerabilities, along with their social and economic implications, are very likely to be exacerbated by climate-related disruptions in the next decades. In addition, the country is affected by acute water scarcity (both surface and underground) with erratic mean annual precipitation level decreasing since 1970. CSA technologies and practises present opportunities for addressing climate change challenges, as well as for economic growth and development of the agriculture sector. Identified CSA practises in use in the country include (i) integrated pest and disease management (IPM)), (ii) drip irrigation, (iii) anti-erosion practises, (iv) soil and water conservation (SWC) techniques, (v) shelterbelts, and (vi) improved seeds/breeds. Several institutions aim to foster the development and adoption of technologies that enhance agriculture productivity and advance CSA practises in Cabo Verde. The ministry of environment, agriculture and fisheries is the main government institutions responsible for the country’s climate change plans and policies. The food and agriculture organisation of the United Nations (FAO) and the United Nations development programme (UNDP) play instrumental roles in the promotion of sustainable agriculture and environmental sustainability. There is no specific funding allocated to CSA per se in the country. However, various projects funded within the purview of agriculture, environmental sustainability and climate change have contributed to delivering CSA goals. Sources of funding include FAO, World Bank, GEF with support of UNDP, etc. The country has also benefitted from other grants to support it in the development of various strategies, action plans, policies and frameworks. Several policies, strategies, plans and programmes are being implemented to fight climate change and promote activities underpinning CSA.
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    Booklet
    Achieving SDG 2 without breaching the 1.5 °C threshold: A global roadmap, Part 1
    How agrifood systems transformation through accelerated climate actions will help achieving food security and nutrition, today and tomorrow, In brief
    2023
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    In 2022, 738.9 million people faced hunger, nearly 2.4 billion in 2022 lacked regular access to adequate food, and over 3.1 billion could not afford healthy diets. The pandemic added 120 million to the number of the chronically undernourished. In 2030, an estimated 590.3 million will suffer hunger. The planet faces crises, exceeding safe limits on six of nine planetary boundaries, and much of them is due to agrifood systems, which contribute 30 percent of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and impede climate goals. Despite the Paris Agreement's aims, warming rates point to a serious gap in meeting targets. Agrifood systems appear to face a dilemma: intensifying efforts to increase productivity while endangering climate goals – or curbing production to reduce emissions. This perceived trade-off has led to inaction and emboldens climate action skeptics who argue climate action harms efforts to address global hunger and malnutrition. Agrifood systems should address food security and nutrition needs and facilitate a large number of actions aligned with mitigation, adaptation and resilience objectives under the larger umbrella of climate action. The climate agenda itself could and should transform agrifood systems and mobilize climate finance to unlock their hidden potential. In the unfolding narrative of our global commitment to transform agrifood systems, FAO embarks on a presenting a Global Roadmap; Achieving SDG2 without breaching the 1.5C threshold. FAO's roadmap involves an extensive process that spans three years, starting with COP 28 in 2023. It commences with a global vision for what ails agrifood systems today and goes on to explore financing options for the actions required, before culminating in a discussion of how to attract concrete investment and policy packages by the time COP 30 takes place. It also examines how to integrate technical assistance into our strategies while supporting sustainable investment plans. Our objective is to create a repository of both bankable and non-bankable projects in various domains.The In Brief version of the roadmap contains the key messages and main points from the report, and is aimed at the media, policy makers and a more general public

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