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Marketing information systems for non-timber forest products









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    Forest natural resource management and non-timber forest products as nature-based solutions for climate adaptation, ecosystem restoration and poverty alleviation in Mali– a case study
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Climate change, nature loss and poverty are major intertwined crises that mutually reinforce each other. This is particularly true for smallholder farmers in Africa’s drylands: they are the hardest hit by the climate crisis, which contributes to the degradation of the land upon which their livelihoods depend. Further pushed into poverty, rural people are forced to resort to unsustainable land practices for survival, feeding the cycle of environmental degradation and climate change. Intertwined crises need integrated approaches, such as nature-based solutions (NbS) that protect natural ecosystems and address societal challenges. Tree Aid works in Africa’s drylands to unlock the potential of trees to tackle poverty and improve the environment. Here, we present a quantitative NbS case study looking at the impacts of the adoption of forest natural resource management (NRM) and increased production of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) among smallholder farmers in the Segou region in Mali between July 2017 and July 2020. This project was a partnership between Tree Aid, the UK funded Darwin Initiative and local partner Sahel Eco.Its socioeconomic impact was evaluated with focus group discussions, baseline and endline assessments using the Rural Household Multi-Indicator Survey (RHoMIS) (https://www.rhomis.org/). Ecosystem restoration impacts were assessed by ecological surveys and data from permanent monitoring plots.We demonstrate that NRM and NTFPs delivered positive outcomes for people (reduction of project population living below the poverty line), biodiversity (+20,404ha of land under improved management), and climate (improved climate resilience through better access to natural resources). This evidences the viability of high-quality NbS in Africa’s drylands and calls for greater long-term restoration investment and deployment in the region informed by and delivered through local communities and organisations. Keywords: NbS, NTFPs, NRM, Mali, forest governance ID: 3622597
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    Non-timber forest products – A key tool to improve food security and nutrition in the drylands of Africa
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Desertification and climate change will reduce the provision of ecosystem services in African drylands, including losses in biodiversity and soil fertility. With a major part of the population in these areas relying heavily on natural resources for survival, this worsens a health situation that is already ridden by hunger & malnutrition. Tree Aid works in Africa’s drylands to unlock the potential of trees to tackle poverty and food security while improving the environment. In particular, the promotion of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) can improve the health of rural populations by enhancing food security and nutrition. Here, we present a quantitative study that explores the impacts of promoting the production and consumption of NTFPs among 33,212 households in four regions of Burkina Faso, which feature the highest malnutrition rates in the country. This project was a partnership between Tree Aid and the Swiss Development Agency and ran from January 2017 to December 2020. Its socioeconomic and nutritional impacts were evaluated with baseline & endline assessments using the Rural Household Multi Indicator Survey1 (RHoMIS), a well-established household survey tool designed to analyse farm systems, a nutritional survey using SMART technology (Standardized Monitoring and Assessment of Relief and Transitions2 ) & focus group discussions. We find that enhancing access of women and vulnerable groups to wild & cultivated NTFPs through nutrition gardens & raising awareness of their nutritional value improves the food and nutritional security of the project rural households. Overall, the 263% increase in the proportion of calories sourced from key NTFPs (shea and baobab), which tripled daily intake per person, contributed to an 8% reduction in the number of households below the calorie line and a 42% reduction in chronic malnutrition in under 5-year-olds. These results reinforce the case for protecting & regenerating forests, which bring significant benefits to human health for rural population across the Sahel. Keywords: NTFP, food security, nutrition, Burkina Faso, Drylands ID: 3623938
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    Towards the development of a strategy for sustainable commercialization of non-timber forest products in Kenya: A situational analysis
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) play a significant role in the livelihoods of Kenyans. This paper reports the key strengths that could be optimized, opportunities available, weaknesses that need to be mitigated, and threats that require recognition to have a strategy for the sustainable commercialization of NTFPs in Kenya. This study was funded by The Restoration Initiative (TRI) project being implemented by FAO and other partners. It involved consultations with 50 institutions and a review of relevant publications, reports, policies, legislation, and strategies. The key interventions in the sub-sector include research and development, resource assessment and mapping, value chain analyses, capacity building, value addition, piloting plantation production, and policy reviews for a limited number of products such as gums and resins, honey, aloes, and mushrooms. The major stakeholders are collectors, community groups, traders, National government agencies, County Governments, private sector actors, development partners, and civil society organizations. Key barriers to the commercialization of NTFPs include deforestation, traditional production, and harvesting technologies, inadequate bulking facilities, insufficient value addition, weak market linkages, and information systems as well as weak policy and institutional frameworks. It is concluded that sustainable commercialization of these products in the country requires a strategy that involves revision/domestication of laws and policies, public-private partnerships, research, innovation, value addition, technology development and transfer, capacity building, synergies and complementarities. Keywords: Non-timber forest products, situational analysis, strategy, Kenya ID: 3485349

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