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Cassava brown streak disease: control measures, Uganda









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Protecting cassava, a neglected crop, from pests and diseases 2019
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    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is the fifth most produced staple food crop in the world, being a basic source of staple food for an estimated 800 million people worldwide. Cassava is an increasingly popular crop. Cassava is grown by smallholder farmers in more than 100 tropical and subtropical countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Thanks to its efficient use of water and soil nutrients and tolerance to drought, cassava can produce reasonable yields using limited or no inputs, even in areas with poor soils and unpredictable rainfall. Like other crops, cassava is vulnerable to pests and diseases that can cause heavy yield losses. Insect pests such as white flies and mealybugs, and diseases caused by viruses and phytoplasma, affect the production of cassava worldwide. Of the viral diseases, Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) and Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) are the most widespread, severely affecting at least 50 percent of cassava crops in Africa. CMD and CBSD pose a serious threat to the food security of 135 million people in Central and East Africa alone. At least half of all plantings in Africa are affected by one of these diseases. Scientists estimate that annually, 15–24 percent (equivalent to approximately 12–23 million tonnes) of the crop is lost due only to CMD in Africa.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    CASSAVA DISEASES in central, eastern and southern Africa (CaCESA)
    Strategic programme framework 2010-2015
    2010
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    This regional strategic programme framework, entitled “Cassava diseases in central, eastern and southern Africaâ€Â (CaCESA), has been prepared by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). It aims to assist countries aff ected by cassava pests and diseases. These are signifi cantly aff ecting groups such as internally displaced persons (IDPs), returnees and the vulnerable whose food security is threatened. CaCESA is designed to assist vulnerable farm families in selected districts of 15 countries1 in central, eastern and southern Africa. These countries are categorized in two groups: (i) countries already aff ected by the Ugandan variant of eastern Africa cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-Ug) and cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) diseases and where some mitigation activities are ongoing (Burundi, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda); and (ii) countries threatened by the spread and progress of cassava diseas es (Angola, Central African Republic, Gabon, Malawi, Mozambique, Sudan, Zambia and Zimbabwe).
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    Document
    Making high-quality cassava flour 2010
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    Cassava is not fully utilized in Eastern Africa compared to West Africa (Nigeria, Ghana). Cassava is drought tolerant, easy to grow and simple to harvest. All parts of the cassava plant are valuable. Cassava leaves can be used to make soup or as feed for livestock, the stems can be used for planting more cassava, for mushroom production or as firewood, the root can be cooked and eaten fresh or processed into flour. Highquality cassava flour is made within a day of harvesting the root. The manual attached gives steps in processing high quality cassava by small holder farmers.

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