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52 Profiles on Agroecology: Farmers improve food and nutritional security through agroecology in Mozambique










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    52 Profiles on Agroecology: Agroecological practices of the small scale farmers of Ramiene In Nampula province, Mozambique 2017
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    Mozambique has a population of about 25 million people. Most live in rural areas and rely on farming for all or part of their household income. Located on Africa’s south-eastern seaboard, the country encompasses biodiversity sites of great significance. Mozambique was in the past a colony of Portugal. The Portuguese settlers were allocated large pieces of land, while most of the working population engaged in manual labour. Agricultural production was focused on increasing the supply of raw mater ials to Portugal. In the two years following independence in 1975 and prior to the outbreak of civil war in 1977, the new Mozambican state concentrated on the agricultural sector making provision for inputs, controlling prices and setting up marketing channels. Today agriculture is said to account for 25% of Mozambique’s gross domestic product (GDP) and the sector employs 80% of the workforce. Women constitute 60% of those working in agriculture (ACB, 2015).
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    Mucuri Springs project: a long-term vision for the preservation of water resources
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The Mucuri Springs Project aims to promote the rational use of natural resources in rural properties located in the Mucuri River Basin, in the northeast of Minas Gerais and the extreme south of Bahia States, Brazil, encouraging the conservation and recovery of springs, watercourses, and permanent preservation areas. The prject also seeks to promote the transition to agroecology, guiding farmers, farmer’s families, and rural communities for more sustainable production, combining food security, income generation, and delivering environmental education throughout public reading policies and training in rural communities. It started in three municipalities of Minas Gerais State, and in 2019 a study was carried out to map the most critical areas in terms of a greater potential for soil loss and for water production. Within over three years of experience, the project has served 49 rural communities and has involved 1,506 families, 351 of which are partners. Altogether, 1,468 springs were mapped and characterized, of which 402 were protected, totaling more than 200 hectares in process of restoration and over 30 thousand native seedlings planted. These areas are being monitored and, when needed, restoration techniques have been proposed. Regarding agroecological practices, until now, agroforestry systems have been implemented in two properties and more than 2,600 seedlings have been supplied and planted to enrich the productive yard and preservation areas. Rotational management was also implemented in eleven pasture areas, 3,30 hectares of family crops were fertilized organically, and 21,50 hectares were given techniques for soil recovery. The Project has the perspective of operating strategically on priority areas of the Mucuri River basin, seeking regular flow and reducing impacts of climate change for the region . Keywords: Partnerships, Deforestation and forest degradation, Economic Development, Education, Sustainable forest management. ID: 3487504
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    Book (stand-alone)
    How can the farmer field school approach be used to support agroecological transitions in family farming in the Global South?
    Recommendations for farmer field school facilitators, agricultural development project designers and managers
    2022
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    The key to implementing farmer field schools (FFS) is to trigger an experimentation process based on collaboration between a group of farmers and a facilitator. The purpose of this document is to provide project managers, technicians and designers with practical information on how to use the FFS approach and adapt it to their context of intervention to support the agroecological transition (AET). It also will be useful for research staff, leaders of farmers' organizations (FOs), teachers and students interested in using the FFS approach or better understand its benefits. The findings and recommendations proposed in this document are the result of a partnership between three institutions working to support AET in the Global South: CIRAD, FAO and the NGO AVSF (Agronomists and Veterinarians Without Borders). This document has four parts: - Definition of the FFS approach and its principles, and characterization of the advantages of this approach to supporting family farm AET in the Global South, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. - Presentation of several important points for a successful FFS, i.e. to strengthen farmers' skills to practically and collectively solve the problems they encounter. This second part is aimed specifically at development project managers and field technicians and facilitators. - Recommendations for project designers and managers for including FFS in development projects. - Proposal of ways in which FSS could evolve to better take into account the needs of farmers and other actors engaged in AET.

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