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Food loss and waste in the food supply chain








Rezaei, Maryam & Liu, Bin. (2017). Food loss and waste in the food supply chain. Nutfruit. Vol. 71. pp. 26-27. 


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    Food Losses and Waste Reduction and Value Chain Development for Food Security in Egypt and Tunisia 2018
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    Food loss and waste (FLW) along food value chains in the Near East and North Africa (NENA) are estimated to reach 250kg per person and cost over 60 billion USD annually. The social, economic, and environmental impacts are serious for a region that relies heavily on global food imports, has limited potential to increase food production, and faces scarcity of water and arable land. Substantial amounts of FLW occur at all stages of the food supply chain, but roughly two-third occurs during production, handling, processing, and distribution of food, whereas one-third occurs at the consumer-level.The project “Food losses and waste reduction and value chain development in Egypt and Tunisia” funded by the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation aims at reducing FLW throughout selected food value chains, focusing primarily on the post-harvest, trading, and processing stages of the chains.
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    Food loss prevention and reduction analysis in Indonesia
    A case study on chili, cabbage and shallot
    2024
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    Food loss and waste within Indonesia's supply chains present significant challenges to both environmental sustainability and efficient natural resource utilization. This pervasive issue spans from food production to retail, affecting the ability of supply chain stakeholders to invest in essential infrastructure improvements. Food waste, in particular, accumulates at various stages, including retail, catering services, and households, further straining natural resources and exacerbating climate change impacts.In Indonesia, the reduction and prevention of food losses assume strategic importance as it directly impacts food availability, accessibility, and the well-being of consumers. Additionally, it alleviates pressure on natural resources, supports the growth of agribusiness, and enhances the livelihoods of farmers and other actors along the supply chains. Key factors closely linked to addressing food losses in Indonesia include finance, technology, knowledge, and market dynamics. Alarmingly, horticultural commodities, especially vegetables, experience losses exceeding 60 percent. Minimizing food losses not only bolsters productivity for agripreneurs but also improves food security and nutrition for all, from vulnerable smallholder farmers to micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs).To address these challenges, Indonesia has enacted national law No. 13/2020 on horticulture, encompassing fruits and vegetables, with the aim of creating jobs, enhancing production, productivity, quality, added value, competitive advantage, and market share. In a recent study conducted between June and December 2022, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Center of System, a logistics research institution, analysed food losses in chili, cabbage and shallot supply chains. These commodities, predominantly cultivated by smallholder farmers, play a vital role in stabilizing food prices, controlling regional inflation, and ensuring food availability and accessibility. The study not only identifies the extent of quality and quantity losses but also provides practical solutions for their reduction.Crucially, enhancing the implementation of hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP), good manufacturing practices (GMP), and good hygiene practices (GHP) is emphasized, particularly during harvest, transportation, handling and storage. Recommendations include establishing post-harvest technical assistance facilities, agrologistic centres, and value-added processing facilities to mitigate losses due to quality degradation. Furthermore, the abstract underscores the need for innovation in technology, private-sector investment, and raising public awareness as decisive elements in substantially reducing food loss. In conclusion, addressing food loss is paramount for enhancing food security, supporting sustainable livelihoods, and fortifying the overall food system in Indonesia.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Regional Conference on food security and income generation through the reduction of losses and waste in fisheries, Nouakchott, Mauritania, 15-17 December 2013 2016
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    The Regional Conference on Food Security and Income Generation through Reduction of Losses and Waste in Fisheries was held from 15 -17 December 2013, in Nouakchott, Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The objectives of the conference were to review the current practices in the sector in the Near East and North Africa region, examine case studies of best practices globally and discuss the best options for the region, and identify policy level and operational level interventions to improve food securi ty and income generation through reduction of losses and waste in fisheries in Near East and North Africa region. Case studies from the region on best practices in five countries were presented and discussed, following which presentations, working groups and discussions focused on four technical topics: a) best practices and strategies for minimizing post-harvest losses and waste; b) improved utilization of fishery by-products for minimizing waste; c) value chain based approach for minimizing fi sh loss and waste; and d) best practices for fish bycatch and discard management. The conference unanimously adopted the Noukchott Declaration, which included, among other things the need for appropriate policies and legislative frameworks and strategies should be established, which include a more participatory approach to fisheries management and to create a supportive and enabling environment for value chain actors in small-scale fisheries. Additionally, declaration called on countries in the region to develop and build the capacity of resource users and managers, including post-harvest stakeholders and service providers, in order to pursue and achieve a significant reduction of loss and waste, throughout the fish supply chain from the catch to the consumer’s table.

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