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Fossil fuel component - framework for calculating fossil fuel use in livestock systems

Framework for calculating fossil fuel use in livestock systems








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Bioenergy and Biofuels
    Factsheet
    2013
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    Bioenergy accounted for roughly ten percent of the world total primary energy supply in 2009. Most of this is consumed in developing countries, where between two and three billion people rely on solid biomass (wood, charcoal, agricultural residues and animal waste) for cooking and heating, often in open fireplaces or traditional cook stoves. Biomass refers to non-fossil material of biological origin, such as energy crops, agricultural and forestry wastes and by-products, manure or microb ial biomass. Biofuel is fuel produced directly or indirectly from biomass such as fuelwood, charcoal, bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas (methane) or biohydrogen. However, most people associate biofuel with liquid biofuels (bioethanol, biodiesel and straight vegetable oil). In this note the term ”biofuels” refers to liquid biofuels used for transport. Bioenergy is energy derived from biofuels.
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    Book (series)
    Fuel and financial savings for operators of small fishing vessels 1999
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    Fishing continues to be the most energy-intensive food production method in the world today, and it depends almost completely upon oil fuel-based internal combustion engines. There are as yet no signs of any other energy source that could substitute the internal combustion engine in either the medium or short term. The industry continues to be exposed to global fuel prices and it cannot be assumed that these will remain stable indefinitely. Small-scale fisheries account for nearly half of the world's fish production and, although they are generally more labour-intensive than larger industrial fisheries, they are increasingly affected by energy costs. In developing countries, in spite of the energy conservation initiatives of the 1980s (subsequent to the dramatic rise in the cost of fossil fuels), mechanization continues to increase. Fuel costs have ever more influence not only on consumer prices but also on fishermen's and boat owners' net incomes. When levels of employment and cost -sharing systems are considered, it becomes even more important from a social perspective to improve and maintain energy efficiency within small-scale fisheries. This guide presents information on the key technical areas that affect energy efficiency, but only part of the information presented herein will be applicable to any particular fishing situation. The guide is not a result of new original fieldwork but draws on much of the research and experience of the past two decades, updated where possible to include new technical developments. The guide is divided into two major sections: the first relates to changes in operational techniques rather than changes in technology; the second presents information of relevance to vessel operators who are either considering the construction of a new vessel or overhauling and re-equipping an existing vessel.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) Toolbox 2016
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    This user guide describes how to use the Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) Toolbox: Woodfuel Assessment in Displacement Settings for supporting field-based actors who are directly involved in the management of natural resources and protection of crisis-affected populations. This tool provides guidance for assessing, monitoring and planning energy-related interventions. The SAFE Toolbox is an Excel-based application, which supports the systematic collection and analysis of multi-sectoral field data on energy needs, woodfuel resources and associated risks and challenges faced by people in displacement settings. The SAFE Toolbox is intended to support the identification of the baseline situation in which no intervention to address the energy needs of displaced and host communities has been carried out. The tool can be used to establish the baseline setting and to develop alternative scenarios to compare against the baseline. The user can simulate alternative scenarios in which improved cooking technologies and new tree plantations are introduced to increase energy efficiency, reduce energy consumption and improve woodfuel supply. These scenarios facilitate the planning of interventions to contribute to safe and sustainable access to energy for cooking and to reduce environmental impacts and other associated risks in displacement settings.

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