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Suriname and FAO

Partnering for sustainable food and agricultural systems









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    Project
    Updating Capture Fisheries Legislation in Suriname - TCP/SUR/3502 2019
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    The fisheries subsector in Suriname is faced by a number of urgent challenges such as outdated legislation, the absence of a Fisheries Management Plan, the lack of an adequate control and monitoring system of marine resources, poor organization within the subsector and limited value added of exported products. The existing legal framework for capture fisheries does not provide the regulatory tools required to manage the fisheries sector efficiently. The Government therefore requested FAO’s assistance to develop an efficient legal framework for capture fisheries management, in line with international best practices and obligations arising out of international legal instruments for fisheries. In response to this request, the project prepared stakeholders to engage in the legislative process and reviewed the current legal framework affecting fisheries, including recommendations on the legal interventions required. Following consultations with stakeholders and legal working group meetings, draft legislation was produced for validation by stakeholders, government officials and experts
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    Booklet
    FAO’s work on social protection
    Contributing to zero hunger, poverty reduction and resilience in rural areas
    2019
    This brochure highlights the important role that social protection has to play in addressing many of the barriers poor rural households face in building resilient and sustainable livelihoods. Despite progress in recent decades, 736 million people worldwide still live in extreme poverty. Most are in rural areas, possess few or no assets and depend on agriculture and the use of natural resources for their livelihoods. A number of programmes have demonstrated not only that social protection can have significant impacts on poverty, but also that even low-income countries can afford to provide it for their citizens, if they commit to doing so. FAO has positioned social protection as a major element in its efforts to reduce rural poverty, respond to climate change, promote resilient livelihoods and achieve Zero Hunger. Social protection spans the entire 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development architecture, from eradicating poverty and reducing income inequality, to increasing social inclusion, promoting gender equality and improving access to health, education and water. FAO is firmly committed to supporting countries in extending and scaling up social protection in order to build a future that leaves no one behind.
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    Meeting
    CELAC Plan for a Food Security, Nutrition and Hunger Eradication 2025 2014
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    This document seeks to fulfill a part of the 13th point of the II CELAC Summit Declaration, held in Havana, Cuba. During that summit, held in 2014, CELAC countries adopted the Caracas Declaration and Action Plan of the Authorities of Social Development for the Eradication of Hunger and Poverty. In its first chapter, the Action Plan refers to food and nutritional security, and its second point indicates that “…we ask FAO, with the cooperation of ALADI and ECLAC, to present to CELAC a project for the creation of a Food Security and Nutrition and Hunger Eradication Plan, to be debated during a technical meeting of government representatives and then presented in the II Meeting of Ministers of Social Development and Hunger and Poverty Eradication.” The current document presents a draft of the Food Security and Nutrition and Hunger Eradication Plan.

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