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Carp polyculture in Central and Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia: A manual.










Woynarovich, A.; Moth-Poulsen, T.; Péteri, A. Carp polyculture in Central and Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia: a manual. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Technical Paper. No. 554. Rome, FAO. 2010. 73p.


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