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Field Handbook: Poplar Harvesting









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    Populus deltoides windbreak: its robust status in wheat production and soil nutrients in Indo-gangetic plains of northern India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Agroforestry systems (AFS) with fast-growing woody crops such as poplar (Populus deltoides) are increasingly integrated into agricultural land because it is considered as a sustainable agricultural practice that combines primary production with other ecosystem services (ES). To optimize the efficiency of AFS, the suggestion is to develop well modified tree-crop integration by limiting competition for resources and capitalize on the coactions. However, yield data of various wheat varieties in AFS are inadequate, in particular for Populus deltoides windbreak at a age of four and five year old plantation. Here we focused on winter wheat varieties (WH-1105, HD-2967 and HD-943) during two consecutive years (2017-2019) comprising delimited by a row of deciduous poplar trees in East-West and North-South directions (East-West tree line divide farmlands into two aspects i.e. Northern and Southern and North-South tree line divide into Eastern and western aspect). While effects on crop produce were limited for all wheat varieties with the increasing distance from tree line, however, five years old poplar planted on field bunds exhibited significant reduction up to 3 m in grain yield of wheat from tree line for all the wheat varieties. The highest available soil N (210.5 kg ha–1), P (15.3 kg ha–1) and K (280.2 kg ha–1) were recorded near tree line at a distance of 3 m. To optimize the provisioning service of poplar windbreak AFS, the cultivation of highly shade tolerant wheat variety HD-2967 may be advisable over other wheat varieties towards the end of the rotation of poplar windbreak AFS. Keywords: Adaptive and integrated management, Food systems, Agriculture, Climate change, Human health and well-being ID: 3486118
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    The farmer with agroforestry practices might be the “next forester”?
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The main tropical Agro-Forestry Systems (AFS) are often complex, multi-stage and multi-species. Apart from home gardens intended for self-consumption, AFS are often based on a main crop with economic, or export value: rubber, coconut, cocoa, coffee, cloves, vanilla, damar, durian... with also local fruit trees, fast-growing fuelwood trees and timber trees for self-consumption or sale. This diversification in AFS focused on industrial crops, often comes after a period of deforestation since the end of the 19th century during the period of the colonial empires. Wood can also come from species used for services such as providing shade for coffee or cocoa trees. Wood species are also common in the local forest (Indonesia/Thailand), reflecting farmers' strategy of conserving local resources. In other cases, native species have almost entirely disappeared (e.g. clove AFS on the East Coast of Madagascar) in favor of introduced species. Sometime, the main crop is also a timber specie such a rubber (used for furniture), Durian, Litchi... Now that most forests have almost disappeared in central plains with easy access in Southeast Asia (with potential commercial value), timber from AFS is becoming a real challenge that depends mainly on tree tenure and local regulation. Today, the current demand for tropical wood has decreased considerably since the golden age of deforestation (1980/2010) due to resource depletion and a global demand towards products from dedicated plantations from Europe or elsewhere. The market has changed from a massive use of tropical timber for multiple purposes to a limited use for specific purposes. In this context, timber in AFS, often produced at marginal cost, can be an alternative to produce valuable timber. We consider in this sense that the farmer in tropical regions with agroforestry practices might be the “forester of the future”. Beside, AFS with timber might significantly contribute to positive externalities and eco- systemic services for a better sustainability. Keywords: agroforestry, forester, timber, diversification. ID 3639413
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    The utilization of rosewood (Dalbergia latifolia Roxb.) by local community in Indonesia has opened a Pandora’s box for the fate of its conservation status
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Dalbergia latifolia Roxb. is one species of the family Papilionaceae. It is also known as Indian rosewood, East Indian rosewood, Bombay Black wood, Palissaneder de I’Inde or d’Asie (France), or Sonokeling (Indonesia). In Indonesia, Sonokeling is often used for high-class furniture raw materials such as bookshelves, cabinets, decorative wood, wood carving and instruments cases. People also use it as shade tree, especially in agroforestry systems and government use Sonokeling for reforestation. Indonesia exports plenty of raw materials for musical instruments, sports equipment, and plywood products. The biggest source of timber trading for this species to date has been obtained from state owned concession or from community land, not from the wild. Some argues that Sonokeling has becoming rare but some claims otherwise. In 2016, D. latifolia Roxb. was included in the CITES Appendix II list. This may affect trading regulation in Indonesia despite the fact that Sonokeling is widely spread in Java island and easy to grow. This study was carried out to open the Pandora’s box of its conservation status that so far based on limited information from their distribution elsewhere. The results revealed a massive density and its distribution in the place where it is first planted. In West Java, growth increment can reach 4-7 cm/year. However, there was a difference in heartwood size between Sonokeling growing in plantation area with those in community’s land. Survey showed of farmers’ less interest to grow Sonokeling intensively and indication of some illegal cutting from plantation area. So far, treatment to enlarge tree diameter is through thinning. While technology to enlarge heartwood remains unknown. The information generated from this study could be used as piece of evidence to further investigate the growth, distribution and to prevent illegal harvesting of Sonokeling in Indonesia. This will possibly help to delisting Sonokeling from CITES Appendix II. Keywords: sonokeling, reforestation, plantation, conservation, CITES, plywood, trading ID: 3486310

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