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World aquaculture 2010










FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department. World aquaculture 2010. FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department. Technical Paper. No. 500/1. Rome, FAO. 2011. 105 pp.


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    World Aquaculture 2020 – A brief overview 2022
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    This document provides a synthesis of six regional aquaculture reviews: Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Near East and North Africa, North America and sub-Saharan Africa. Global aquaculture production, including aquatic plants, in 2018 was 114.5 million tonnes, with an estimated value of USD 263 billion. The Asia-Pacific region continued to be the major producer. Globally, aquaculture provides over 50 percent of fish for human consumption. In 2018, aquaculturists were reported to farm about 622 species or species items including 387 finfishes, 111 molluscs, 64 crustaceans, seven frogs and reptiles, ten miscellaneous aquatic invertebrates and 43 aquatic plants. From 2000-2018, aquaculture production in freshwater, brackish water and marine water increased at a compound annual growth rate of 5.7 percent, 7.7 percent and 5.2 percent respectively while total aquaculture production grew at an annual growth rate of 5.6 percent. Global food supply and per capita consumption of fish and fish products continued to increase faster than human population growth. Aquaculture is striving to innovate in order to increase production and sustainability. Progress in biosecurity and fish health management, feed formulation and utilization, and genetic resource management are showing good, but uneven progress. The aquaculture sector faces challenges including competition for land and water resources, as well as external factors such as climate change, conflict, economic uncertainties and most recently the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic and other stresses such as droughts and tsunamis, revealed that the aquaculture industry has not engaged sufficiently in disaster preparedness. International and national mechanisms are being put in place to increase the sustainability, good governance and social license of the sector to address these challenges. The diversity of the sector, the opportunities for good jobs and commitments by governments to good governance will help the sector meet these challenges.
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    Regional Review on Status and Trends in Aquaculture Development in Asia-Pacific 2015 2017
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    Aquaculture is still the fastest growing food producing sector in the world. In 2014, aquaculture produced 73.8 million tonnes of aquatic animals, with an estimated first-sale value of US$160.2 billion and 27.3 million tonnes of aquatic plants worth US$5.6 billion., in 2014. Almost all fish produced from aquaculture are destined for human consumption, although by-products may be used for non-food purposes. Thirty-five countries produced more farmed than wild-caught fish in 2014 and four top prod ucers in Asia-Pacific, namely, Bangladesh, China, India and Viet Nam are included in this group. Historically, the Asia-Pacific region (in particular China, South Asia and South-east Asia sub-regions) has dominated global aquaculture production, both in quantity and value; the region contributed 65.2 million tonnes of aquatic animals, amounting to 88 percent of the global total in 2014. The value of Asia-Pacific regional aquatic animal production in 2014 was 79 percent of the global total, amoun ting to US$127 billion. In terms of consumption, it is apparent that more fish and shrimp are now consumed in Asia than ever. While this trend is continuing, the demand for improved high quality, nutritious, safer to eat and easy to cook (precooked) aquatic products will continue in the region. While many countries in Asia-Pacific have made commendable efforts to set up policies, administrative, legal and regulatory frameworks to properly develop and manage aquaculture, some countries in the re gion are still lagging behind. And in some of the countries who have made conducive policies, their implementation is delayed by the lack of financial and skilled human resources. Policies and regulations may be enacted, but unless there are sufficient government personnel with adequate skills and financial resources to monitor and enforce them, they will remain ineffective. This issue must be addressed without delay if the aquaculture sector in Asia-Pacific is to further continue to develop sus tainably.
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    Book (series)
    Regional Review on Status and Trends in Aquaculture Development in Asia-Pacific - 2010 2011
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    This review covers the vast Asia-Pacific region comprising Oceania, South, Southeast, East and Central Asia. In 2008, the region produced 92.5 percent of the world¿s total aquaculture production by volume but also consumed 70 percent of its own production. It should produce an additional 30¿40 million tonnes more by 2050 to maintain the current consumption in the region at 29 kg a year per person. From past performance, it is seen to be capable of doing so, but will have to resolve a range of pr oductivity, environmental, social and market access issues. The status of aquaculture production, its stage of development and the relative importance of each issue are unsurprisingly diverse across the many countries and territories. The outstanding regional characteristics are the dominance (except in Central Asia) of small-scale mostly commercially oriented farms, the dominance of cultured freshwater species in number and output and, as a recent FAO survey reveals, the low productivity of l abour and the low employment multiplier of aquaculture in general, except in Oceania. These are circumscribed by the diminishing availability of land and freshwater, climate change and globalization of trade. To cope, farmers in the region will have to become more efficient, environmentally and socially responsible and competitive. The governance of the sector has set them towards the proper direction to acquire these capacities; its main features are the increasing use of market-based incenti ves and the adoption by farmers of voluntary governance mechanisms that include better management practices (BMPs) and codes of conduct (CoCs), bolstered by their association. Guided by progressive policies and regulations, these have shown that they can stimulate higher production, enable better returns, induce responsible farming practices, and produce higher quality and safer aquatic products. This, in capsule, is the major lesson from the region¿s recent history of aquaculture development. The challenge is to widely promote, adopt and sustain it in practice.

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