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Maximizing nutrition in the fisheries and aquaculture sector in Kenya

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    Maximizing nutrition in the crop production sector in Ghana
    In brief
    2021
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    The crop sector is the largest of all the food sectors, providing sustenance for all 7.8 billion people in the world, as well as 1.3 billion of the 2.5 billion agricultural jobs worldwide. The sector has traditionally focused on providing calories and reducing famine by maximizing productivity. This choice has come to the detriment of production diversity, resulting in many consumers being unable to access the full range of crops, including fruits and vegetables, needed for a healthy diet. Integrating nutrition into the crop production system remains critical to addressing the unacceptably high global prevalence of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. However, uncertainty over what practical approach to adopt remains a challenge for policymakers and practitioners at all levels due to a lack of proven methodological tools. To help address this challenge the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, with support from World Vision, has developed an innovative stepwise approach that combines theory and practice by establishing a theory of change and associated impact pathways. This work was carried out as part of a consultative process involving expert stakeholders from Ghana. The results obtained demonstrate the utility of this methodological process in helping political decision-makers and technicians formulate and evaluate nutrition-sensitive policies, programmes and interventions.
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    Maximizing nutrition in the forestry sector in Uganda
    In brief
    2021
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    Wild foods are an ecosystem service that contributes to household food consumption in all countries. Studies have found that wild foods serve three main roles: a) as a food source when food security is reduced, b) as a supplementary source of food nutrition and c) as a modest source of income for those who sell wild food products at local markets. Integrating nutrition into wild food production systems is critical to addressing the unacceptably high global prevalence of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. However, uncertainty over what practical approach to adopt remains a challenge due to a lack of proven methodological tools. To help address this challenge the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), with support from World Vision (WV), has developed an innovative stepwise approach that combines theory and practice by establishing a theory of change and associated impact pathways. This work was carried out as part of a consultative process involving expert stakeholders from Uganda. The results obtained demonstrate the utility of this methodological process in helping political decision-makers and field officers formulate and evaluate nutrition-sensitive policies, programmes, and interventions.
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    Maximising nutrition into the forestry sector : from theory to practice using a stepwise impact pathway approach
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Although forests, particularly wild foods, contribute to up to two thirds of forest dwellers’ and even the wider community’s food security and nutrition, few measures are in place that protect wild foods as a right. This burden is largely the result of gaps within the forestry sector. Formal food systems involving land ownership, rights and sustainable production do not exist for most wild foods, leading to the limited contribution of wild foods to food security, nutrition and livelihoods.

    Protecting these communities and food systems by providing a food systems-based, nutrition sensitive and supportive policy and research environment will allow them to improve and sustainably manage their resources and maintain their cultural and traditional practices. This could lead to improved health and nutritional outcomes, especially among vulnerable groups such as women and children, and a greater resilience to threats such as climate change and zoonotic disease.

    Integrating nutrition into forestry sector is critical to addressing the prevalence of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. However, uncertainty over what practical approach to adopt remains a challenge for policymakers and practitioners at all levels, due to a lack of proven methodological tools. To help address this challenge, the FAO, World Vision and Action contre la Faim have developed an innovative stepwise approach that guides users on the use of food systems-based impact pathways for integrating nutrition into the forestry sector. This work was carried out as part of a consultative process involving technical experts and operational stakeholders from Uganda, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Chad. The results obtained demonstrate the utility of this methodological process in helping political decision-makers and field officers formulate and evaluate nutrition-sensitive policies, programmes and interventions. Keywords: Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation, One Health, Policies, Sustainable forest management ID: 3623064

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