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Guide to Harvesting and Post-Harvest Handling of Cashew Nuts








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    Project
    Improved Post-Harvest Handling and Processing Techniques for Value Addition of Cashew Nuts and Coffee in the Chittagong Hill Tracts - TCP/BGD/3609 2021
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    The remote and hilly Chittagong Hill Tracts ( of Bangladesh are geographically, topographically and ethno culturally different from the country’s low lying plains They are home to approximately 1 7 million people from 12 different ethnic groups, with the majority of households being engaged in subsistence farming The agricultural potential for field crops in the area is low however, fruit tree crops have been found to grow well in upland areas These crops, including bananas, citrus fruits, jackfruit, lychees, mangoes and papayas, are gradually replacing jum a traditional form of shifting cultivation that is carried out on very steep slopes The income provided by fruit tree cultivation has improved the livelihoods of smallholder farmers by helping them generate income Investments have been made to expand fruit tree plantations in the CHTs, which are expected to increase production substantially in the near future.
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    Increasing yield of mango with selective harvest 2017
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    Due to inaccurate methods of harvesting, farmers tend to deteriorate the quality of mangoes and obtain reduced yields of the fruit resulting in a loss of income of the farmers. Through selective harvesting techniques, mangoes are harvested in three stages from the trees based on their maturity level. Also, proper picking poles are used to harvest the mangoes in order to avoid dropping them on the ground causing subsequent damage. This technique explains how to harvest mangoes properly and how the mango harvest can be planned in order to reduce post-harvest losses.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    SAHEL WEATHER AND CROP SITUATION - October 1999 1999
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    After abundant rains in mid or late August in several parts of the Sahel, rainfall decreased somewhat in September but remained generally widespread and above normal. During the first two dekads, rains were well distributed over the producing zones of the Sahel and abundant in Senegal, The Gambia, Guinea Bissau, Burkina Faso and Chad. However, they were more limited in Mali. During the third dekad, they stopped in north-western Senegal and central Chad but continued over all the other producing zones. Cumulative rainfall is generally normal to above normal in Burkina Faso, Chad, The Gambia, Niger and Senegal. High water levels in the Senegal and Niger rivers caused flooding, notably in Mauritania. Soil moisture reserves are adequate except in some areas in northern Senegal and Niger. Early millet and sorghum are maturing or reaching harvest stage in most productive zones. Satellite images for the first dekad of October indicate that cloud coverage continued over most producing zones of Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso and Chad but diminished over Mauritania, north-eastern Burkina Faso and Niger. Precipitation remained above normal in southern and central Senegal, Mali, western Burkina Faso and southern Chad. Overall, good harvests are anticipated in most countries. Pastures are abundant and of good quality, notably in Mauritania. Pest infestations (mostly grasshoppers, blister beetles and floral insects) were reported in Cape Verde, Niger, and Senegal. A small outbreak of De sert Locusts occurred in northern Mali as a result of exceptionally good breeding conditions. Limited breeding has also been reported in Mauritania. Elsewhere, no significant developments are expected.

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