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Fisheries management in the Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction











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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Improved Knowledge on South East Atlantic Ecosystems Supporting Deep-Sea Fisheries Management in the Areas beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ) 2016
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    In January and February 2015, the research vessel Dr Fridtjof Nansen conducted a 29-day research cruise to map selected seamounts of the South East Atlantic Fisheries Organisation (SEAFO) Convention Area. The cruise was a collaboration between SEAFO and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), and supported by three projects: the EAF-Nansen project, the FAO-Norway Deep Sea fisheries project, and the ABNJ Deep Seas project under the FAO-led Common Oceans programme funded by the Global Environment Facility. This flyer depicts the preliminary results and how these were integrated into the management advice of the regional fishery managment body for the Southeast Atlantic (SEAFO), leading to the confirmation of existing and adoption of revised fisheries management measures aiming to protect certain areas of the ocean from significant adverse impact.
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    Book (series)
    Terminal evaluation of the areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) Deep-Sea project, part of the “Sustainable fisheries management and biodiversity conservation of deep-sea living marine resources and ecosystems in ABNJ”
    Project code: GCP/GLO/366/GFF GEF ID: 4660
    2020
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    The marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) comprises 40 percent of the earth’s surface, it covers 64 percent of the surface of the ocean and 95 percent of its volume. The Common Oceans ABNJ Program (2014-2019) was implemented by FAO as a concerted effort to bring various stakeholders to work together to manage and conserve the world’s common oceans. The ABNJ Deep-Sea project, one component of the Common Oceans ABNJ Program, was of great assistance to newly-formed regional fisheries management organization and arrangements (RFMO/As), as well as some long-standing regional fisheries. The project showed positive results in safeguarding vulnerable marine ecosystems, strengthening monitoring, control and surveillance to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, mitigating bycatch mortality trends, and building awareness of cross-sectoral aspects in effective governance of ABNJ. Through its cooperation with RFMOs, the project has, to some extent, contributed to minimize the negative impacts of bycatch. Results achieved should be capitalized on and upscaled in a second phase.
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    Report of the Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction Deep Sea Meeting 2019, 7–9 May 2019, Rome, Italy 2020
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    The Common Oceans ABNJ Deep Seas Project is funded by the Global Environment Fund and implemented by FAO and the UN Environment Programme. The partnership brings together a broad range of partners, including regional fisheries bodies responsible for the management of deep-sea fisheries, fishing industry partners, and international organizations to achieve sustainable fisheries management and biodiversity conservation of deep-sea living resources in the ABNJ. To showcase existing knowledge, practices and innovative research for sustainable deep-sea fisheries management and biodiversity conservation in the ABNJ, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), in collaboration with UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) and the SponGES Project consortium, organized a meeting – the ABNJ Deep Sea Meeting 2019 – that took place on 7-9 May 2019, at FAO Headquarters in Rome, Italy. Over 40 participants, including representatives from partner organizations and other stakeholders from multiple sectors within the ABNJ, attended the three-day meeting. While significant progress has been made in the management of deep-sea fisheries and in the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems, the ABNJ still faces threats from climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity loss, and pollution. Building on the achievements of the Common Oceans ABNJ Deep Sea Projects and the SponGES Project, the participants were invited to give presentations on key topics and discuss emerging issues concerning ABNJ governance and deep-sea research, monitoring and management.

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