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Gender-responsive needs assessment for mechanization

Questionnaire








  • personal information;
  • land, crop, value chain and division of work;
  • workload;
  • access to and constraints in adopting agricultural mechanization; and
  • mechanization services.
Why do we carry out a gender-responsive needs assessment for mechanization?
  • Gender dynamics and social norms determine technology access and use.
  • Even though no role is necessarily exclusively performed by just women or men, the traditional division of labour tends to assign specific responsibilities along value chains to women and others to men.
  • Women and men have different technology and mechanization needs. These needs do not always determine the choice of machines and equipment.
  • Women tend to be more affected by the drudgery of manual work (hence work burden and time poverty). At the same time, men often carry out tasks that are supported by technology.
  • There is a need to identify critical gender gaps and constraints in access to local institutions and organizations that determine technology use and management.
  • There is a need to identify critical gender gaps and constraints in access to key formal and informal services such as information, repair and maintenance, training, financial and business development services, etc.




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