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Value Chain Development of Banana and Citrus in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3702








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    Capacity Building for the Management of Small-Pelagic Fisheries in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3606 2020
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    Eritrea’s agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors account for 17 percent of the country’s annual gross domestic product (GDP), but the fisheries sub-sector only contributes 18 percent of this value, or 3 percent of the national total. Annual per capita fish consumption is low in Eritrea, with an estimated annual per capita fish consumption of 0.4 kilograms, compared to an African-wide average of 9.8 kilograms. In fact, low dietary diversity and access to protein-rich foods among certain segments of the population continues to be a problem, especially among the rural, coastal and more isolated communities, many of whom work in or depend on small-scale fisheries. In addition, fish food consumption remains skewed towards urban populations. From having the second lowest Human Development Index (HDI) out of the 188 countries assessed in 2015 to experiencing high levels of inter-annual variability in market, export and exchange rate activities, Eritrea has an underdeveloped private investment context from which productivity gains and economic diversification could otherwise prosper. The small-pelagic fisheries sector, for instance, has the potential to yield cost-effective investments at scale while actively contributing to poverty reduction and food security and nutrition. With 2 500 kilometers of coastline, including the Dahlak Archipelago where small-pelagic fish varieties are found, Eritrea’s potential in developing its fisheries sector has been halted by a complex, post-independence socioeconomic context. Recent declines in output, employment and income in the small-scale fisheries sector were not due to overfishing or unsustainable natural resource practices. Instead, this is part of broader programmatic and institutional challenges in national sustainable development plans. The Government of Eritrea has therefore published its Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper, identifying three priorities for the fisheries sector.  Increase the profitability of artisanal fisheries by strengthening rural cooperatives and linking them to high-value export markets;  Boost export earnings by creating suitable investment climates for investors; and  Strengthen resource management practices to ensure environmental sustainability.
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    Project
    Capacity Building for the Management of Small-Pelagic Fisheries in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3606 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Eritrea’s agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors account for 17 percent of the country’s annual gross domestic product (GDP), but the fisheries sub-sector only contributes 18 percent of this value, or 3 percent of the national total. Annual per capita fish consumption is low in Eritrea, with an estimated annual per capita fish consumption of 0.4 kilograms, compared to an African-wide average of 9.8 kilograms. In fact, low dietary diversity and access to protein-rich foods among certain segments of the population continues to be a problem, especially among the rural, coastal and more isolated communities, many of whom work in or depend on small-scale fisheries. In addition, fish food consumption remains skewed towards urban populations. From having the second lowest Human Development Index (HDI) out of the 188 countries assessed in 2015 to experiencing high levels of inter-annual variability in market, export and exchange rate activities, Eritrea has an underdeveloped private investment context from which productivity gains and economic diversification could otherwise prosper. The small-pelagic fisheries sector, for instance, has the potential to yield cost-effective investments at scale while actively contributing to poverty reduction and food security and nutrition. With 2 500 kilometers of coastline, including the Dahlak Archipelago where small-pelagic fish varieties are found, Eritrea’s potential in developing its fisheries sector has been halted by a complex, post-independence socioeconomic context. Recent declines in output, employment and income in the small-scale fisheries sector were not due to overfishing or unsustainable natural resource practices. Instead, this is part of broader programmatic and institutional challenges in national sustainable development plans. The Government of Eritrea has therefore published its Interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper, identifying three priorities for the fisheries sector.
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    Strengthening Capacities for the Prevention of Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3610 2020
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    Pest and disease outbreaks threaten to harm crop production and pastures Eritrea, where approximately 75 percent of the population relies on agriculture, animal husbandry and fishing for their livelihood. The country has dealt with many migratory pests in the past, including the African Armyworm, locusts, and grain-eating birds, all of which have caused significant yield and pasture losses. In 2016, the Fall Armyworm (FAW) appeared in Africa, and it rapidly spread to 32 different countries on the continent. When FAW outbreaks were reported in Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya and neighboring Ethiopia, concern regarding the spread of the pest to Eritrea grew, owing to the fact that it has the same agro-ecological conditions as these other countries. The FAW attacks many of Eritrea’s major crops, including maize, millet, sorghum, barley and wheat. Outbreaks of FAW can result in grain losses of between 25 and 75 percent, and they can damage vast rangelands for livestock production. Because the FAW presents such a serious threat to food security, economic activity and livelihoods, this project was designed to mitigate its effects through the strengthening of capacities to detect, manage and control the pest in Eritrea. It is important to note that during project formulation, the FAW had not yet arrived in Eritrea; therefore, the main focus of the project design was prevention. That said, the pest was detected in the country in 2018, but it was successfully managed thanks to the interventions of this project.

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