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Good practices for the resilience of rural livelihoods for food and nutrition security

The added value of coordination, collaboration and synergy between FAO and WFP











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    Book (stand-alone)
    Technical report on the regional workshop on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), fisheries, and legal acquisition findings with Latin American and Caribbean countries
    8 to 11 May 2023
    2024
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    This document contains the report of the regional training workshop on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), fisheries, and legal acquisition findings (LAFs) for 13 Latin American and Caribbean countries, jointly organized by the Development Law Service of the FAO Legal Office and the CITES Secretariat, in collaboration with the FAO Offices for Ecuador and Latin America and the Caribbean. The workshop was held in Spanish and in-person only from 8 to 11 May 2023. The workshop aimed to raise awareness and strengthen the understanding of CITES requirements and their implementation in the fisheries sector; introduce and train participants on the use of the FAO-CITES Legal Study and Guide; train participants on the use of the Rapid Guide for the Making of LAFs, available at Annex 3 of Resolution 18.7 (Rev. CoP19); and identify countries’ needs and interests for a better implementation of CITES in the fisheries sector.A total of 50 participants joined the workshop from 13 countries in the Latin American and Caribbean region (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Venezuela [Bolivarian Republic of]), regional organizations (the Central American and Dominican Republic Wildlife Enforcement Network and Permanent Commission for the South Pacific), non-governmental organizations (Defenders of Wildlife and World Fund for Nature), the private sector (fishing enterprises), as well as the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, in addition to the CITES Secretariat and FAO.The four-day programme included presentations on CITES key principles and requirements and their applicability in the fisheries sector; clarifications on commercially exploited aquatic species listed in CITES Appendix II, opportunities for collaboration between CITES and fisheries authorities, correlations between CITES and fisheries management; introduction on how to use the FAO-CITES Legal Study and Guide; the relevance to CITES of the Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing, Catch Documentation Scheme, and associated technical guidelines. Additionally, the workshop promoted the use of the Rapid Guide for the Making of LAFs.This is the third of a series of legal training workshops on CITES and fisheries organized by the CITES Secretariat and FAO. The first and second workshops were held at the subregional level, respectively, for Pacific Island countries (November 2021) and English-speaking Caribbean countries (May–June 2022).
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    Article
    Analysis of independent forest vigilance experiences in Honduras, Panamá and Perú: inputs for the good forest governance
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Illegal logging is one of the main drivers associated to tropical forest degradation and deforestation, being a problem structurally related to weaknesses in law enforcement and forest governance processes. Independent Forest Vigilance is a participatory and empowering social process in which civil society and independent actors verify legality in forestry activities and influence the sector’s transparency and governance. There are only few studies about the existing models of this activity, especially in Latin America. Within the framework of the FAO EU FLEGT Program, this study systematized Independent Forest Vigilance experiences and projects in three countries: the Independent Forest Monitoring and the ‘Contraloría Social’ (civil society controllership) of Forest Management and of FLEGT VPA in Honduras, the ‘Veeduría Forestal Ciudadana’ (forestry oversight) in Panamá, and the Indigenous ‘Veeduría’ in Perú. Three distinct vigilance approaches were identified: an intrasectorial operative approach, based on the verification of norm compliance in exploitation activities; a strategic extrasectorial approach, based on the verification of the performance of actors of the Honduras FLEGT VPA; and a territorial management approach, based on technical assistance, community representation and control in the forestry and environmental fields. Although the countries have conceptually well-developed mechanisms, the degree of practical application is variable, and even little consolidated in some cases. Economic sustainability, recognition by authorities, independence, and coordination with actors from the verification and control systems are the main challenges to be faced in the process of strengthening these mechanisms. Nonetheless, their great potential to contribute to the improvement of governance is widely recognized, especially in the realms of legality verification, control and law enforcement, institutional internal control systems, and the sector’s transparency. Keywords: Governance, Illegal trade, Monitoring and data collection, Deforestation and forest degradation ID: 3477063
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Rural transport of food products in Latin America and the Caribbean 2004
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    Transportation is fundamental for the development of human activities, especially production and trade-related activities, including the production and trade of agricultural products. The swiftness and cleanliness of transport have a direct impact on food availability, given the special nature of food of agricultural origin, which is always to some extent perishable. Sanitation, food safety and the economy in general all come into play here, especially the cost structure of the supply chains and the final price of food products. This document presents case studies drawn from 17 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. Duly adjusted and adapted, they may also be useful for an interpretation of transportation problems in other parts of the world. The study covers the region of Central America and Panama (Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama), the Expanded MERCOSUR countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and U ruguay), and the Andean Pact countries (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela). One country from each of these three regions is also reviewed in detail.

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