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Enhancing knowledge on climate change mitigation and adaptation for food security and nutrition











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    Policy brief
    What have we learned from trees? Three decades of farmer field schools on agroforestry and forestry 2022
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    Over the last three decades, Farmer Field Schools (FFS) have proven to be an effective discovery-learning-capacity building approach to help rural populations to innovate with more clarity and purpose while building the social skills needed for rural transformation and empowerment. The diverse forestry and agroforestry applications of the FFS demonstrate a high impact on fostering ecological literacy and unlocking creative capacities in problem solving. Producers are encouraged to take ownership of change occurring at the local level. FFSs in forestry and agroforestry can help rural families and producer organizations develop multiple ways of reducing the environmental impacts of agriculture and contribute to rehabilitating ecologies and restoring ecosystems. The experiences of farmer field schools (FFS) around the world show a tremendous potential to advance small-scale forestry and agroforestry. By applying the FFS approach to agroforestry and forestry, it is possible to: Enable family farmers to develop the necessary knowledge, skills and social organization to achieve a more regenerative natural resource stewardship in and through small-scale and family farming, and to collectively contribute to sustainability and climate change targets. Support people-centred forest extension and community-based forestry by demonstrating the key role of better education and ecological literacy in empowering change in rural communities. Develop “response-ability”, i.e. the capacity of small-scale producers to respond to challenges in agriculture, food and natural resources management with renewed creativity, knowledge and technological development. Develop multiple ways of reducing the environmental impacts of agriculture while ensuring food security and nutrition and contributing to ecosystems restoration, climate change mitigation and adaptation as well as biodiversity conservation.
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    Policy brief
    Enabling farmer-led ecosystem restoration
    Farmer field schools on forestry and agroforestry
    2023
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    Agricultural expansion is responsible for almost 90 percent of deforestation worldwide, making it a leading driver of biodiversity and habitat loss. Cropland expansion is the main driver, causing almost 50 percent of global deforestation, followed by livestock grazing, which accounts for 38.5 percent. This situation of great concern presents a critical question: How can agriculture continue to feed growing populations while contributing to the urgent restoration of the planet's ecosystems? Climate change mitigation programmes mostly aim to reduce emissions, protect natural forests and afforest abandoned areas. However, it is also important to adequately address the issues of the 2 billion family farmers who cultivate a third of the planet's surface area. About 550 million family farms – 84 percent of which are less than 2 ha – produce a significant share of the world's food. These smallholder farmers are especially vulnerable to climate and environmental change because their livelihoods often depend primarily on agriculture. Over the last 35 years, farmer field schools (FFS) have demonstrated their relevance in answering the growing international call for a re-direction in agriculture. FFS on forestry and agroforestry-related areas have helped rural people to deepen their knowledge of trees and forests, and stabilize and increase food, fibre and energy production while rehabilitating soils and pastures, and restoring biodiversity, shade trees, watersheds and landscapes. It emerged from an FAO stocktaking that FFS partners and programmes across Africa, Asia and Latin America have gained substantial knowledge in advancing small-scale forestry and agroforestry in an inclusive way. FFS on forestry and agroforestry can enable smallholders across the globe to advance the understanding, skills and social organization needed for more regenerative natural resource stewardship.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Sustainable saline agriculture for climate adaptation and mitigation: A call for action 2023
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    Saline agriculture is gradually being recognized as a response to the global challenge of salinization aggravated by climate change. The current document is the result of a collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, along with the Wageningen University & Research (WUR), the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) and the Asian Development Bank (ADB), which led to a session dedicated to sustainable saline agriculture as a response to climate change. It was held at the Water Pavilion of the 26th Conference of Parties (COP26) of 2021. Further exchanges between these parties took place, leading to a commitment to advance saline agriculture. This document calls for a dynamic and inclusive international collaboration through partnerships to accelerate the development of sustainable and climate-smart agriculture on saline lands, and proposes the key steps that have to be taken to further the multilateral actions on saline agriculture at several levels.

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