Thumbnail Image

Roots, tubers, plantains and bananas in animal feeding









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Legume Trees and other Fodder Trees as Protein Sources for Livestock 1992
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Fodder trees and fodder shrubs have always played a significant role in feeding domestic animals. In fact, trees and shrubs are increasingly recognized as important components of animal feeding, particularly as suppliers of protein and especially in harsh environmental conditions. In such situations, the available grazing is not generally sufficient to meet the maintenance requirements of animals, at least for part of the year. This occurs, for example, in some mountainous regions and in the dry tropicswhere the grazing is also sometimes very degraded. Thus, in extensive animal production systems in the dry areas of Africa, it is generallye stimated that ligneous materials contribute up to 90% of production and account for 40-50% of the total available feed. Such figures illustrate the existing and urgent need not only for better knowledge but also for better use of such potential, particularly in the context of environmental degradation which is affecting our planet. On the other ha nd, in the humid tropics of Latin America, the South-cast Asia and Africa, foddersfrom trees and shrubs from leguminous species - are beginning to be utilized more dietary nitrogen supplements for ruminants. In this respect, new a significant move to look for new sources of protein from shrubs. However, given the increasing demand for forage and availability of low quality basal feed materials which require protein supplementation, high protein fodders from leguminous trees and shrubs could have a much more significant role in animal feeding systems throughout the developing world. In this respect, there is a need for more research to develop technically viable solutions. These solutions must also be economically and socially acceptable; they must preserve natural resources and protect the environment. In other words, the challenge is the sustainable development of fodder trees and shrubs.........
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Research approaches and methods for evaluating the protein quality of human foods
    Report of a FAO Expert Working Group, 2 – 5 March 2014, Bangalore, India
    2014
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Following the 2011 FAO Expert Consultation on dietary protein quality evaluation in human nutrition, a working group was convened in Bangalore, India from 2-5 March 2014 to explore and develop means for producing more data accessible worldwide of ileal amino acid digestibility of human foods, particularly for foods consumed in low income countries. The paucity of data, especially from human studies, remains an obstacle to the practical implementation of the DIASS method for evaluating protein qu ality. The report considers protocols including recommended best practice for pig-based, rat-based and human based assays for true ileal amino acid digestibility determinations to support the generation of new data. The working group considered the development of protocols that would allow non-invasive measures of ileal amino acid digestibility in humans with primary reliance on novel approaches using minimally invasive stable isotopes tracers. Such an exercise would need to involve the determin ation of ileal protein and amino acid digestibility in both humans and animal models to allow the development of robust inter-species protein digestibility predictions.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    International Conference on Domestication and Commercialization of Non-Timber Forest Products in Agroforestry Systems 1996
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The International Conference on Domestication and Commercialization of Non-Timber Forest Products in Agroforestry Systems, hosted by ICRAF, was held in Nairobi, Kenya, from 19 to 23 February 1996. This was the first world-level meeting to be held exclusively to draw attention to issues dealing with domestication and commercialization of non-timber forest products in agroforestry systems.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.