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Gender assessment of dairy value chain










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    Gender assessment of dairy value chain 2017
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    The present study is a gender assessment of the dairy value chain in selected sites in Ethiopia: North Shoa Shewa (Degem woreda), East Gojam (Dejen woreda) and Gamu Gofa Arba Minch (Arba Minch Zuria woreda). It relies on evidence gathered through fieldwork complemented by a review of specialized background documentation. The findings confirm that women’s empowerment is vital for sustainable dairy value chain development and that projects supporting dairy production need to increase their efforts to be gender inclusive. The study provides country-specific recommendations for Ethiopia, which also feed into a more general knowledge base on how to develop gender-sensitive dairy value chains.
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    Eastern African dairy value chains: what prospects for women in trade?
    Gender policy developments for inclusive dairy markets and trade in Ethiopia, Kenya and Rwanda
    2024
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    In Eastern Africa, dairy value chains are an important source of income and employment for millions of smallholders, particularly for women who provide an essential contribution to the growth of the dairy sector. While the sector is rapidly growing, and expanding trade in dairy products holds immense potential for boosting inclusive economic growth in Eastern Africa, dairy trade mostly remains a small-scale domestic business in the region. In particular, women’s engagement in dairy markets and trade is constrained by gender-based barriers and inequalities, and dairy intensification and commercialization processes have led to uneven outcomes for women and men. As many countries are increasingly investing in the modernization of their dairy farming systems to spur dairy productivity and commercialization, it is essential that the gender implications of the market-driven development of the dairy sector are taken into consideration. This report reviews gender issues in the Eastern Africa dairy value chains, with a focus on markets and trade, in the context of broader regional policy frameworks and evolving market scenarios. In particular, gender policy developments in agricultural and trade policies relevant for the dairy sector are assessed for Ethiopia, Kenya and Rwanda. By bridging the value chain level into the enabling policy dimension, this study attempts to contribute to ongoing debates on the prospects for women’s participation in dairy markets and trade through more gender-responsive policymaking.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Developing gender-sensitive value chains
    Guidelines for practitioners
    2018
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    What efforts need to be made to effectively mainstream gender in agrifood value chain projects and programmes? When can a value chain intervention be considered ‘gender-sensitive’? What actions can be implemented to address gender inequalities along the chain? These guidelines aim to respond to these questions and support practitioners in translating the Gender-Sensitive Value Chain Framework, developed by the FAO into action. Building on FAO’s comparative advantage on gender in agriculture and food security, these guidelines are primarily intended to assist practitioners in designing and implementing interventions that provide women and men with equal opportunities to benefit from agrifood value chain development. They offer practical tools and examples of successful approaches to foster a more systematic integration of gender equality dimensions in value chain interventions in the agricultural sector and enhance the social impact of these interventions. The guidelines are targeted to practitioners in a wide range of organizations and institutions, including national governments, international and NGOs, research institutes and the private sector, in particular: »» value chain practitioners who want to ensure that their interventions are inclusive and socially sustainable, and seek support on how best to address gender issues in their work on agrifood value chains; »» gender experts who are tasked with supporting the integration of gender equality and women’s empowerment objectives in agrifood value chain interventions.

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