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Farm yard manure and water hyacinth compost applications to enhance organic matter and water holding capacity of soils in drought prone areas of Bangladesh









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Soil management: compost production and use in tropical and subtropical environments
    FAO Soils Bulletin No. 56
    1987
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    The objective of this Soils Bulletin is to promote the use of locally available organic materials to increase soil organic matter content for improvement of soil fertility, and as a sources of plant nutrients in conjunction with mineral fertilizers. This manual is written for all those concerned with the maintenance and improvement of soil fertility, especially under tropical and subtropical conditions. It contains material for use in farmer training. The severe drought and famine in parts of Africa in 1985 have shown the necessity for adequate soil organic matter to prevent hillside erosion and to retain moisture in the soil for crop growth. The cost of mineral fertilizers and their relative scarcity in some areas has increased the need to recycle waste organic materials as sources of crop nutrients. This Bulletin explains the basic composting process, suitable organic wastes, practical composting methods, use of the product in a variety of situations and a consideration of econo mic and social benefits. It also deals with approaches to practical extension work with farmers on the subject.
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    Document
    Preparation and use of compost 2010
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    Compost is an organic fertilizer that can be made on the farm at very low cost. The most important input is the farmer's labour. Compost is decomposed organic matter, such as crop residues and/or animal manure. Most of these ingredients can be easily found around the farm. Agromisa’s Question and Answer Service frequently receives questions from farmers who face a problem with a decreasing fertility of their soils. Due to soil fertility problems, crop returns often decrease and the crops are more susceptible to pests and diseases because they are in bad condition. In order to increase soil fertility in the short run, nutrients have to be added to the soil. This is often done by applying chemical fertilizers. Chemical fertilizers, however, are expensive to purchase and for most small-scale farmers, this is a problem. Preparation and use of compost can be a solution to that problem.
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    Book (series)
    Nitrogen inputs to agricultural soils from livestock manure. New Statistics 2018
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    The global agricultural sector today faces the double challenge of feeding a growing population while preserving the underlying natural resources of land, water and air. In the meantime, already a third of the world’s soils are degraded. Soil and nutrient management techniques aimed at restoring soil health will therefore be essential to meeting these challenges. Livestock manure is a source of nitrogen and other plant nutrients when applied to soils. It is also high in organic matter and can help address soil deficiencies and improve soil quality. However, inappropriate manure management can have detrimental effects on the environment due to pollution from losses of excess nutrients to waterways and the atmosphere. This report sheds light on the amount of nitrogen applied to agricultural soils from livestock manure at different scales, and on the relevance of producing, refining and monitoring statistics on livestock manure for environmental and agronomic policy and planning. The report presents the relevant statistics available at FAO to this end, and demonstrates how they can be used for a nutrient input analysis at a national, regional and global level. The data include FAOSTAT chemical and mineral fertilizers statistics integrated with estimates of livestock manure from the FAOSTAT and the Global Livestock Environmental Assessment Model. This report is intended for use by various audiences, including agricultural statistics services or agencies in relevant line ministries, academia, industry and the general public in member countries, and provides country-level reference statistics using internationally-recognized and transparent methodologies.

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