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REFLOR-CV: Adaptation of local communities to the impacts of climate change in Cabo Verde through restoration of wooded areas

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Booklet
    Climate-Smart Agriculture in Cabo Verde 2019
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    The climate smart agriculture (CSA) concept reflects an ambition to improve the integration of agriculture development and climate responsiveness. It aims to achieve food security and broader development goals under a changing climate and increasing food demand. CSA initiatives sustainably increase productivity, enhance resilience, and reduce/remove greenhouse gases (GHGs), and require planning to address trade-offs and synergies between three pillars: productivity, adaptation and mitigation. The priorities of different countries and stakeholders are reflected to achieve more efficient, effective, and equitable food systems that address challenges in environment, social, and economic dimensions across productive landscapes. The country profile provides a snapshot of a developing baseline created to initiate discussion, both within countries and globally, about entry points for investing in CSA at scale. Cabo Verde is an archipelago developing country in West Africa of volcanic origin having an ecological and landscape diversity associated to the geomorphological characteristics of the islands and to the influences of the actions of climate elements and anthropic pressure on the existing resources. Agricultural land in the country is about 79000ha representing 19.6% of the total land area. Agriculture is predominantly based on subsistence family production. The production systems present can be categorised into rainfed and irrigated systems. Major crops produced include maize, pulses, vegetables, coconut, sugar cane, coffee and fruits. In terms of agricultural inputs, Cabo Verde has an irrigation potential of 3,109ha although a small proportion (5.9%) of the agricultural areas is equipped for irrigation. However, drip irrigation has expanded fast, with investments made in water mobilisation and gravity irrigation schemes. Cereals continue to constitute the major parts of Cabo Verdean diet although diets are now more diversified with more proteins and micronutrients-rich foods. As a small island development state (SIDS), Cabo Verde has one of the lowest GHG emissions per capita. Challenges to agriculture include (i) growth in population and food demand, (ii) limited marketing opportunities of agricultural commodities, (iii) climate change and variability, and (iv) food waste. Climate models ran during 2008-2012 have shown that the country’s natural vulnerabilities, along with their social and economic implications, are very likely to be exacerbated by climate-related disruptions in the next decades. In addition, the country is affected by acute water scarcity (both surface and underground) with erratic mean annual precipitation level decreasing since 1970. CSA technologies and practises present opportunities for addressing climate change challenges, as well as for economic growth and development of the agriculture sector. Identified CSA practises in use in the country include (i) integrated pest and disease management (IPM)), (ii) drip irrigation, (iii) anti-erosion practises, (iv) soil and water conservation (SWC) techniques, (v) shelterbelts, and (vi) improved seeds/breeds. Several institutions aim to foster the development and adoption of technologies that enhance agriculture productivity and advance CSA practises in Cabo Verde. The ministry of environment, agriculture and fisheries is the main government institutions responsible for the country’s climate change plans and policies. The food and agriculture organisation of the United Nations (FAO) and the United Nations development programme (UNDP) play instrumental roles in the promotion of sustainable agriculture and environmental sustainability. There is no specific funding allocated to CSA per se in the country. However, various projects funded within the purview of agriculture, environmental sustainability and climate change have contributed to delivering CSA goals. Sources of funding include FAO, World Bank, GEF with support of UNDP, etc. The country has also benefitted from other grants to support it in the development of various strategies, action plans, policies and frameworks. Several policies, strategies, plans and programmes are being implemented to fight climate change and promote activities underpinning CSA.
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    Article
    The influence of over-mature, degraded Nothofagus forests with strong anthropic disturbance on the quality of an andisol and Its gradual recovery with silvopasture in southwestern South America
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The increasing demand for timber and non-timber products from native forests in Chile and the cattle grazing has augmented the rate of degradation of these ecosystems. This process results in the need to know which of the dynamic variables are involved in its regulation. Soil quality indicators like soil organic carbon (SOC), soil microbial respiration (SMR), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), potential net N mineralization (N-min), and nitrification (N-NO), soil aggregates, and light fraction (LF), were evaluated at two different depths of the soil in Nothofagus obliqua (deciduous) and mixed N. dombeyi - N. obliqua (evergreen-deciduous) forests, where a 30- ha silvopastoral trial was established, after this evaluation, in early 2016. The SOC, SMR, MBC, N-min and N-NO were significantly higher in the N. obliqua forest than the mixed forest, 8%, 17%, 17%, 40%, 20%, respectively (p<0.05). The dry weight in soil fractions did not present differences between forest types. C and N contents in the LF (labile, un-decomposed organic matter of plant origin) were higher in the deciduous forest, 9% and 20%, respectively (p<0.05). Our results suggest that soil quality was favored by the quality of organic matter in the site dominated by deciduous species, which translates into more favorable conditions for the activity of microorganisms, nitrogen dynamic, and C and N content in the light faction. The intrinsic characteristics of the plant residues associated with higher rates of decomposition, can stimulate the activity of the biota and especially the soil microorganisms, which would lead to higher values of the different indicators evaluated. This novel silvopastoral system will likely help restore the most degraded sites through improvement of the soil quality. This kind of information allows obtaining knowledge of the forest areas and their sustainability, mainly for the planning of long-term, durable silvopastoral practices. Keywords: Forest degradation, Nothofagus obliqua, N. dombeyi, silvopastoral systems, Temperate Forest, Volcanic soil ID:3484562
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    Document
    Type classification of damaged forest in the Island Areas, west coast of Korea and analysis on the charaterisitics of restoration sites
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The study aims to produce basic data which can be used in establishing a forest restoration plan in the island areas of the west coast of Korea. First, the damaged type of island area was determined based on the GIS data, and a field study was carried out on 110 of the extracted damaged areas for classified type of forest restoration sites with the Forest Restoration Guidelines of the Korea Forest Service. As a result of the analysis, the total number of islands on the west coast of Korea was 1,977 (254,258 ha), with 323 (248,258 ha) of manned islands and 1,654 (5,871 ha) of uninhabited islands. 11 damage types (590 locations) were extracted through video reading of 2,774 suspected deforestation cases (5,431 ha). The field survey was conducted on 110 locations on 44 islands which were reclassified into 14 damage types. Among the types of forest restoration target sites, the types of damage (12 places) that require restoration of the underlying environment are classified into three categories: facility sites, soil and stone ground, and landslide-damaged sites. it was found to be a man-made damages concentrated in private land with high development pressure, especially in Incheon and Jeollanam-do province by region. Vegetation restoration included 9 different types of damage (96 sites) and it was analyzed that Incheon Metropolitan City and Chungcheongnam-do province have a high rate of grassland and livestock grazing land and Jeollabuk-do province with high distribution of grassland and non-stocked forest land. And Jeollanam-do province had 8 types of damage, relatively more various types of damage confirmed compared to other areas. Habitat and species restoration are required for bird colonies and coastal wetland types (one site, respectively). Plants are dying due to fishery and neglected household waste and bird excrement, therefore it shall be considered from the habitat restoration point of view. The research results are expected to be used in extracting target sites for forest restoration plan and a criteria to find the target sites suitable for the characteristics of damaged areas. Keywords: Monitoring and data collection ID: 3622908

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