Thumbnail Image

Capacity Building and Technical Assistance; New Approaches and Building Alliances









Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
    Food Safety Capacity Building 2002
    Need and challenge stand out as the two driving forces associated with capacity building and technical assistance: the need for developing countries to improve food safety and quality measures and the challenges of meeting this need. This paper discusses the need for improvement of food quality and safety systems in developing countries in the context of food security, public health protection and international trade and examines means of addressing the associated challenges through new approach es in capacity building and technical assistance.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
    FAO/WHO Regional Conference on Food Safety for the Americas and the Caribbean - FInal Report - San Jose (Costa Rica), 6-9 December 2005
    Practical actions to promote food safety
    2006
    Also available in:

    Ensuring safe food is essential for the protection of human health and for improving the quality of life in all countries. The importance of safe food, whether domestically produced and consumed, imported or exported, is well known by the countries of the Americas and the Caribbean. An estimated 57,000 deaths have occurred in Latin America and the Caribbean as a result of food- and waterborne diarrhoea in 2004, but even this estimated burden likely greatly underestimates the true magnitude of th e food-borne disease problem in the region. Each food-borne disease outbreak results in a number of direct and indirect costs, in addition to the resultant human suffering. Furthermore, food safety is foundational to all other issues in the area of nutrition and food security, as well as international trade of foods. Food exports from the region are currently worth some US$66 billion, or 12% of the world's total food trade, and this figure could increase rapidly over the coming decades if food s afety and quality standards are improved. Despite these well-known and important reasons, many challenges remain to improving food safety in the region. The countries of the region recognize the importance of developing practical actions for capacity building to overcome these challenges and to promote food safety in the region. Accordingly, following the guidance of the FAO/WHO governing bodies, in line with the suggestions made by the participants at the first and second Joint FAO/WHO Global Fora of Food Safety Regulators (GF1-Morocco, January 2002 and GF2- Thailand, October 2004) and the kind invitation of the Government of Costa Rica, FAO and WHO jointly convened the first Regional Conference on Food Safety for the Americas and the Caribbean in San José, Costa Rica from 6 to 9 December 2005. The Conference brought together over 175 delegates from 32 member countries of the Americas and the Caribbean and observers from 14 international governmental and non-governmental organizatio ns to discuss food safety issues in the region, under the general theme of “Practical Actions to Promote Food Safety”. The participants at the Conference recommended a series of practical actions to the member countries and to FAO and WHO to strengthen food safety systems in the region. It was generally recognized by the participants that although the convening of the Conference itself was successful, its true success can only be measured by the degree of implementation of the recommended actio ns of the Conference and the improved safety of foods produced and consumed in the region.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
    New approaches to consider in capacity building and technical assistance building alliances
    Country Paper proposed by Eritrea
    2002
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Eritrea is a young country having gained independence from colonial rule in 1991 after 30 years of armed struggle. Fill international recognition of independence was achieved in 1993. However, in 1998 Eritrea suffered a further 2 years of bitter war with its neighbour, Ethiopia. These wars and repeated droughts have placed an enormous strain on the national economy. Eritrea has a GDP per capita of US$200 (1999) and is ranked 159th/174 of the world's poorest countries (UNDP Human Development Repo rt (2000). During the most resent war with Ethiopia almost all abled-bodies men were conscripted into the armed forces and much of the country's limited financial resources were directed towards the pursuit of the conflict. In spite of these difficulties in the recent past, Eritrea has once again resumed implementation of the strategy for reconstruction of infrastructures and other assets and has been obliged to undertake a programme for the resettlement of displaced persons and returning r efugees. Much effort has been made in capacity building in the field of disease prevention and eradication, up grading the inspection and laboratory techniques capacity building. These are in fact, helpful in producing nutritious, quality and safe food, which is main goal of this forum.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.