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FAO/WHO Regional Conference on Food Safety for the Americas and the Caribbean - FInal Report - San Jose (Costa Rica), 6-9 December 2005

Practical actions to promote food safety








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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO/WHO Regional Conference on Food Safety for Asia and the Pacific - 24–27 May 2004, Seremban, Malaysia - FINAL REPORT 2004
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    The Regional Conference on Food Safety for Asia and the Pacific, jointly convened by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), took place from 24 to 27 May 2004 in Seremban, Malaysia, at the kind invitation of the Government of Malaysia. Over 230 delegates from 35 member countries and territories of Asia and the Pacific Region and observers from 10 international governmental and non-governmental organizations participated to develo p practical actions and recommendations for capacity building to promote food safety in the region. The participants at the Conference affirmed that the countries of the region recognized the enormous gap between the scale and cost of food-borne illnesses and their capacity to address them. It was generally recognized by the participants that although the convening of the Conference itself was successful, its true success can only be measured with the full implementation of the recommendations o f the Conference and the improved safety of foods produced and consumed in the region.
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    Booklet
    Food safety aspects of cell-based food
    Report of the publication launch webinar, 7 April 2023
    2024
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) held a webinar to launch the publication entitled “Food safety aspects of cell-based food” published in April 2023. The webinar was attended by a total of 1 015 participants from more than 75 countries.Cell-based food production involves culturing animal cells in a controlled environment to produce various types of food products. As this technology is constantly evolving, it is important for food safety authorities to keep up with science in order to understand how the products are developed and what food safety considerations are relevant when taking regulatory actions. The webinar included a lecture on the subject by the chairperson of the FAO-led expert consultation, who introduced the contents of the FAO/WHO publication and presented the results of the first global food safety hazard identification of cell-based food. Experts reported that most of the hazards identified were common to conventional food products and emphasized the importance for food safety competent authorities to focus on the materials, inputs and equipment specific to cell-based food production.Two regulatory experts from the governments of Singapore and Qatar took part in the webinar to introduce the case studies of their respective countries’ regulatory frameworks. These case studies illustrated the commonly held idea that a food safety assessment is one of the first steps within the regulatory frameworks presented in the case studies, despite the fact that other elements within the framework may be different. This was borne out by subsequent panel discussions with six panellists from Argentina, Australia, Qatar, Singapore, the United States of America and Zambia who all concurred that a food safety assessment provides a crucial starting point. All panellists emphasized the importance of the FAO/WHO publication as an invaluable source of technical information in this regard, particularly as it lists potential hazards that regulators can draw on. The publication also contains vital information on nomenclature and useful advice on ways to effectively communicate this topic to the public.The webinar included an interactive discussion session with the participants, during which basic food safety and regulatory questions were raised. FAO and WHO concluded the webinar with the offer to provide technical assistance to those countries in need of it.
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    Project
    Establishment of a New Analytical Laboratory at a Food Production Facility in Dekemhare City, Eritrea - TCP/ERI/3609 2020
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    Food safety and quality are essential for food security, public health and economic development. Improving laboratory-testing capacity contributes to increasing the supply of safe, wholesome high-quality food by reducing the impact of food-borne diseases that can cause illness and death. Food quality analysis and management also help to stem the economic consequences of food-borne illness and food insecurity, contributing to a healthier, more prosperous and productive nation. Ensuring the safety and quality of foods also promotes international trade and access to new markets, which provides a means to strengthen livelihoods all along the value chain, alleviating poverty and hunger. Eritrea is a young East African country, gaining independence in May 1991 after a 30-year war with Ethiopia. The development of industry in Eritrea, including the food industry and laboratories, dates back to the Italian colonial period (1890-1941), when Eritrea had a relatively prosperous economy. However, during British rule (1941-1952) and the Ethiopian administration that followed, a lack of investment led to a deterioration of its infrastructure. Eritrea’s current industrial base is made up of numerous small- and medium-sized enterprises, and the Government is making a significant effort to increase their contribution to the national economy – including private-sector food production and processing enterprises. However, Eritrea’s Government is facing several macro-economic challenges, which are affecting the operations of various ministries including Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Health. As a result, preventive activities such as those related to food safety receive less priority than curative medical services. This has seriously affected the ministries’ operation and monitoring of food safety analysis. The national food control system needs an urgent review and redesign. Establishment of basic operational and management systems, including training and capacity building of laboratory staff and laboratory accreditation to international standards, are needed to strengthen this system and enhance its capacity for ensuring that safe and nutritiousfood reaches consumers. Fisheries and agriculture are important economic sectors that have good potential for producing export earnings with relatively low levels of investment. However, ever-increasing international food safety standards and trade regulations are seriously hampering the export of agricultural products and hence the country's efforts to gain market access.

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