Thumbnail Image

Decision Support for Systems Approach Manual











Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Evaluation of the Information on Nutrition, Food Security and Resilience for Decision Making (INFORMED) Programme
    Project code: GCP/INT/245/EC
    2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The INFORMED programme, implemented by FAO from 2015 to 2019, was designed to contribute to “increasing the resilience of livelihoods to threats and crises and contributing to the reduction of food insecurity and malnutrition”. The programme’s increased focused on Early Warning for Early Action (EWEA) was very relevant to fill existing gaps with a comparative advantage for FAO in slow onset and food chain crises contexts. Promoting the use of pre-agreed plans and pre-identified anticipatory actions, the project effectively improved risk analysis and decision making, including through the Global Report on Food Crises, and increased access to appropriate financing instruments, while the EWEA country toolkit initial positive spinoffs remain to be built on. Efforts to support resilience measurement and analyses by applying the resilience index measurement and analysis (RIMA) methodology are relevant given the significant investments in resilience programming and the continuing methodological gaps. However, although RIMA provides a basis for creating evidence on resilience investments, and FAO has been an important pioneer in resilience measurement, a wider system supporting resilience analysis is needed, based on a range of methodologies, responding to the information needs of decision-makers. Also, RIMA baseline lacks sufficient detail to allow articulating the feasibility of possible response options and have a practical impact on planning decisions; it has not demonstrated its added value over pre-existing food security, nutrition and risk indicators to help target interventions, and is not well adapted as an impact evaluation tool. Assessing INFORMED results against its intention to support knowledge production and sharing, to promote the replication of good practices and circular learning, the evaluation questioned the choice of creating a new knowledge management platform versus adopting a collaborative approach building on similar initiatives’ strengths. Poor strategic choices represented a fundamental constraint to reach intended objectives, such as, an insufficient understanding of users explaining the difficulty to trace the uptake and use of knowledge products. Nevertheless, the evaluation recognized the progressive investments in knowledge management and sizeable accomplishments of a relatively small team. The evaluation suggests strengthening capacities for the production and dissemination of forecast, scenario-based early warning as a basis for early action; developing a corporate strategy for partnering to strengthen early warning system capacities at various levels; promoting the use of a toolkit of approaches and investing in a knowledge management function dedicated to capturing and disseminating lessons on the effectiveness of EWEA and resilience interventions.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    C.A.F.E: A multi-objective decision support system for eco-hydrological forest management that quantifies and optimizes different ecosystem services. 2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Sustainable forest management is a powerful nature-based solution for climate-change adaptation and mitigation. In this sense, knowledge of the ecosystem services (ES) generated by forests is essential to plan and implement efficient management alternatives, especially when resources are threatened by climate change. Even more so in forests with low timber productivity, such as semi-arid Mediterranean ecosystems, where forest management based exclusively on timber products, which is the most easily monetizable service and therefore the most attractive for companies and individuals, is not profitable. C.A.F.E. (Carbon, Aqua, Fire & Eco-resilience) is a Multi-Objective Decision Support System for forest management that quantifies and optimizes ES derived from forest management, thus paving the way to payment for ES schemes. It is based on the combination of multiple pyro-eco-hydrological processes simulated by process-based models and multi-criteria optimization with genetic evolutionary algorithms. This tool allows managers to plan the silvicultural operations oriented towards thinning or planting necessary for multi-criteria forest management, answering the following 4 fundamental questions: How much, where, when or how do I have to act? In addition, it allows to see how climate change scenarios influence silvicultural actions and the production of goods and ES. The provided results are a list of possible silvicultural actions (Pareto front), each of one, associated with the quantification of the targeted ES and compared to the base line situation. As Pareto front, all solutions provided are equally valid and none is better than the other. To select a final solution, users must establish their priorities in terms of ES by filtering the solutions with the help of an iterative visualization interface. Keywords: Sustainable forest management, Climate change, Knowledge management, Landscape management, Innovation. ID:3623151
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Maximising nutrition into the forestry sector : from theory to practice using a stepwise impact pathway approach
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Although forests, particularly wild foods, contribute to up to two thirds of forest dwellers’ and even the wider community’s food security and nutrition, few measures are in place that protect wild foods as a right. This burden is largely the result of gaps within the forestry sector. Formal food systems involving land ownership, rights and sustainable production do not exist for most wild foods, leading to the limited contribution of wild foods to food security, nutrition and livelihoods.

    Protecting these communities and food systems by providing a food systems-based, nutrition sensitive and supportive policy and research environment will allow them to improve and sustainably manage their resources and maintain their cultural and traditional practices. This could lead to improved health and nutritional outcomes, especially among vulnerable groups such as women and children, and a greater resilience to threats such as climate change and zoonotic disease.

    Integrating nutrition into forestry sector is critical to addressing the prevalence of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. However, uncertainty over what practical approach to adopt remains a challenge for policymakers and practitioners at all levels, due to a lack of proven methodological tools. To help address this challenge, the FAO, World Vision and Action contre la Faim have developed an innovative stepwise approach that guides users on the use of food systems-based impact pathways for integrating nutrition into the forestry sector. This work was carried out as part of a consultative process involving technical experts and operational stakeholders from Uganda, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Chad. The results obtained demonstrate the utility of this methodological process in helping political decision-makers and field officers formulate and evaluate nutrition-sensitive policies, programmes and interventions. Keywords: Agriculture, Biodiversity conservation, One Health, Policies, Sustainable forest management ID: 3623064

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.