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Livestock sector development for poverty reduction: an economic and policy perspective Livestock’s many virtues










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    Book (series)
    Livestock Sector Policies and Programmes in Developing Countries
    A Menu for Practitioners
    2010
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    The livestock sector contributes to the livelihoods of an estimated 70 percent of the worlds rural poor. The increasing demand for animal protein in low and middle income countries provides an opportunity for the poor to improve their livelihoods. However, the nature of livestock farming is determined by policy and institutional frameworks that rarely favour the poor. Launched in 2001 by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initia tive (PPLPI) facilitates and supports the formulation and implementation of livestock-related policies and institutional changes that have a positive impact on the world’s poor. To achieve this, PPLPI combines stakeholder engagement with research and analysis, information dissemination and capacity strengthening. Livestock Sector Policies and Programmes in Developing Countries A Menu for Practitioners comprises a user-friendly, non technical compilation of livestock sector policies /programmes, including case studies, to assist policy makers and development practitioners in formulating and implementing plans for institutional reforms and livestock sector-related policies that will benefit livestock farmers in particular and, in general, all stakeholders along the value chain.
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    Booklet
    A framework for gender-responsive livestock development
    Contributing to a world free from hunger, malnutrition, poverty and inequality
    2023
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    Gender dynamics affect the ways in which the livestock sector contributes to sustaining livelihoods. Women comprise most poor livestock keepers in low- and middle-income countries, and are less represented in scaled-up production enterprises and other income-earning livestock-related activities. They also have limited access to livestock information, input and output services, as compared to their male counterparts. When production scales up, often as a result of investments or government policies to develop value chains, women can bear the brunt of increased workload and be pushed out of the accrued benefits. Such gender-based disadvantage is not only hindering the development of the livestock sector, but is also widening the gender gap. In this context, empowering women and girls is essential for both the sustainable development of the livestock sector, and for achieving gender equality. These in turn are key for building a world free from hunger, malnutrition and poverty, with resilient livelihoods for everyone. The Framework for Gender-Responsive Livestock Development was jointly developed by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Bank and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), with the aim of supporting the planning and implementation of gender-responsive policies, projects and investments related to the development of the livestock sector. It provides an overarching framework to support the formulation of action plans and guidance documents contributing to gender equality and women’s empowerment through livestock development.
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    Document
    Supporting Livestock Sector Development for Poverty Reduction: Issues and Proposals
    Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock
    2009
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    Agriculture is the single most important source of livelihood for the majority of the world’s extreme / absolute (< 1$/day) poor. Since most poor rural households keep livestock as part of their portfolio of agricultural activities, agricultural populations are still increasing while land is becoming increasingly scarce, and the demand for animal source food is rapidly growing, investing into livestock sector development appears a promising means for governments and the development community to contribute to agricultural growth and thereby accelerate poverty reduction. The success of ‘standard’ agricultural development projects in general and of livestock sector development projects in particular in contributing to large-scale and persisting poverty reduction has been at best mixed, whereas policy and institutional reforms which improve the ‘business environment’ for the livestock-dependent poor and other stakeholders along the value chain have been shown to hold more promise for steer ing the livestock sector onto a ‘pro-poor’ development pathway.

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