Thumbnail Image

Bivalve depuration: fundamental and practical aspects










Lee, R.; Lovatelli, A.; Ababouch, L. Bivalve depuration: fundamental and practical aspects. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 511. Rome, FAO. 2008. 139p.



Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    The hatchery culture of bivalves: a practical manual 2004
    Bivalve mollusc culture is an important and rapidly expanding sector of world aquaculture production, representing approximately 20% of this output at 14 million tonnes in 2000. The majority of production is from natural populations although increasingly stocks are approaching or have exceeded maximum sustainable yields. Enhancement of stocks through the capture and relaying of natural seed in both extensive and intensive forms of culture is common practice worldwide but the reliability of natur al recruitment can never be guaranteed and conflicts over the use of the coastal zone are becoming ever more pressing. A solution to meeting the seed requirements of the bivalve industry, applicable to the production of high unit value species such as clams, oysters and scallops, is hatchery culture. The production of seed through hatchery propagation accounts at the present time for only a small percentage of the total seed requirement but it is likely to become increasingly important as work continues to produce genetically selected strains with desirable characteristics suited to particular conditions. The advent of bivalve hatcheries was in the 1960s in Europe and the U.S. Since those early pioneering days knowledge of the biological requirements of the various species that predominate in worldwide aquaculture production and the technology by which to produce them has and continues to improve. This manual brings together the current state of knowledge in describing the v arious aspects of hatchery culture and production from acquisition of broodstock to the stage at which the seed are of sufficient size to transfer to sea-based growout. Focus is on intensive methodology in purpose built hatchery facilities rather than on more extensive methods of seed production in land-based pond systems. This manual is not intended as a scientific treatise on the subject. Rather, it is practical in nature providing the reader with an insight into what is required in the w ay of resources and details of how to handle and manage the various life history stages of bivalves in the hatchery production cycle.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Small-scale Oyster Culture on the West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia - BOBP/REP/63 1993
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper describes small-scale oyster culture trials carried out in the states of Kedah and Perak on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Rafts and longlines were found to be economically viable and the technology was transferred to fishermen. Spat of the slipper oyster, Crassostrea iredalei, were transplanted from the east coast of peninsular Malaysia to the west coast sites. Small-scale depuration units were established at farm sites and a series of market promotions successfully un dertaken. Hatchery seed production and remote setting were done by biologists and staff of the Fisheries Research Institute with assistance from temporarily hired field biologists. Artificial spat production was necessary to supplement short supplies of wild spat. Acknowledgement is due to the Director General of Fisheries, Malaysia, Dato Shahrom bin Haji Abdul Majid, for his kind support and permission to publish this paper. Thanks are also due to the Director of Research, Mr. Ong K ah Sin, for his guidance and encouragement, and to Messrs. Ng Fong Oon and Kamal Zaman for their contributions. The trials were undertaken from 1988 till mid-1993 as a BOBP subproject under the regional project “Small- scale Fisherfolk Communities in the Bay of Bengal” (GCP/RAS/ll8/MUL) funded by DANIDA (Danish International Development Assistance) and SIDA (Swedish International Development Authority).
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Toxicity Equivalency Factors for Marine Biotoxins Associated with Bivalve Molluscs 2016
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    World bivalve molluscs production (capture + aquaculture) has been increasing substantially in the last fifty years, going from nearly one million tonnes in 1950 to about 15 million tonnes in 2012. Being filter feeders, bivalves utilise natural plankton and detritus as feed and do not require artificial feeds. But this filter feeding nature is also the reason for the requirement of strict environmental hygiene to produce bivalves safe for human consumption. They tend to concentrate microorganism s, toxins and chemicals from the environment and therefore, their safety management requires stringent sanitary measures to ensure consumer protection. Following the request of Codex Committee on Fish and Fishery Products (CCFFP), FAO/WHO agreed to develop a technical document on the subject of Toxicity Equivalency Factors (TEFs) for marine biotoxins. This document is of high importance for food safety managers in member countries of both FAO and WHO.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.