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Off-grid rural electrification options using crop and woody residues in Côte d’Ivoire

Bioenergy and Food Security (BEFS) case study











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    Book (stand-alone)
    Improved charcoal technologies and briquette production from woody residues in Malawi 2018
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    Access to modern energy in Malawi remains low and is often limited to relying on traditional biomass sources such as fuelwood and charcoal. Sustainably sourced biomass and more efficient technologies can contribute to reducing the energy access gap and making energy access more sustainable. This case study presents opportunities lying within technology improvement and a specific set of woody residues’ bioenergy supply chains. The case study illustrates the steps required to assess if the selected bioenergy supply chains can contribute to mitigating unsustainable use of biomass, while improving access to sustainable energy.
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    Sustainable bioenergy potential from crop, livestock and woody residues in Rwanda: An integrated bioenergy and food security approach 2023
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    Access to sustainable energy is essential for development, poverty reduction and food security. Rwanda, like many other developing countries, is working on identifying sustainable energy solutions to ensure access to energy. Bioenergy is one possible form of renewable energy that countries are looking at to supply part of their energy portfolio. Rwanda currently relies on traditional biomass for energy supply, and shifting away from traditional biomass use would lower its dependency on traditional biomass and improve access to modern sustainable energy forms. Sustainable bioenergy interlinks closely with the agriculture sector, therefore it is necessary to find specific options that minimize negative impacts on the environment and food security. This accomplishes the dual purpose of energy security and food security. This report assesses the use of agriculture residues for the production of bioenergy in Rwanda. The methodology used for the assessment is the Bioenergy and Food Security (BEFS) approach of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). The report provides a detailed assessment of the potential of crop, livestock and woody biomass availability for the production of off-grid electricity solutions and cooking fuels. Through the assessment, a number of specific bioenergy pathways are identified as suitable for bioenergy production. These options should be carried forward for piloting in the country and ground truthing.
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    Project
    Realizing the Potential and Managing the Risks of Solar Irrigation in the Near East and North Africa - TCP/RAB/3604 2020
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    In recent years, solar irrigation has become increasingly interesting for countries as a reliable, clean-energy solution for agricultural water management, especially in areas with high-incident solar radiation. As investment costs for solar-powered irrigation systems (SPIS) are decreasing, SPIS technologies are becoming a viable option for many farmers. In rural areas, solar irrigation can be a means to ensuring access to energy for agriculture, and possibly for other users in rural areas that lack reliable access to electricity or where diesel fuel is expensive. Some countries are promoting SPIS in the framework of national action plans against climate change, as a way of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in agriculture. The conditions for SPIS vary from country to country, in terms of biophysical and climatic suitability, techno-economic feasibility, institutional arrangements, regulations and policy support, financing and economic viability of systems. There is now an opportunity to not simply introduce a clean-energy, climate-smart and relatively affordable technology, but to think strategically about how this technology can be used to regulate groundwater use, provide energy access to rural areas, and promote innovative investment models and organizational structures. Against this background, the project sought to strengthen institutional capacities in two target countries, Egypt and Tunisia, by learning from existing experiences to understand how to promote and regulate the use of SPIS, and fostering policy dialogue across sectors to ensure a coordinated approach to SPIS, with the overall aim of improving natural resources management and encouraging low-emission and climate-smart agriculture; as well as providing training for technical experts to act as multipliers of knowledge.

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