Thumbnail Image

The Bali Package – implications for trade and food security








Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    After Bali: WTO rules applying to public food reserves 2014
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Once more, agriculture threatened to prevent all progress in multilateral trade rule-making at the Ninth WTO Ministerial Conference in December 2013. But this time, the “magic of Bali” worked. After the clock had been stopped mainly because of the food security file, the ministers adopted a comprehensive package of decisions and declarations mainly in respect of development issues. Five are about agriculture. Decision 38 on Public Stockholding for Food Security Purposes contains a “peace clause” which will now be shielding certain stockpile programmes from subsidy complaints in formal litigation. This article provides contextual background and analyses this decision from a legal perspective. It finds that, at best, Decision 38 provides a starting point for a WTO Work Programme for food security, for review at the Eleventh Ministerial Conference which will probably take place in 2017. At worst, it may unduly widen the limited window for government-financed competition existing under p resent rules in the WTO Agreement on Agriculture – yet without increasing global food security or even guaranteeing that no subsidy claims will be launched, or entertained, under the WTO dispute settlement mechanism. Hence, the Work Programme should find more coherence between farm support and socio-economic and trade objectives when it comes to stockpiles. This also encompasses a review of the present WTO rules applying to other forms of food reserves and to regional or “virtual” stockpiles. A nother “low hanging fruit” would be a decision to exempt food aid purchases from export restrictions.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    FAO Fact Sheets: Input for the WTO Ministerial Meeting in Cancún 2003
    Also available in:

    For the WTO Ministerial meeting in Cancún, Mexico, FAO has produced fifteen briefings on trade issues critical to developing countries in the current negotiations. Their purpose is to provide basic facts and issues relating to agriculture, fisheries and forestry. They cover facts and issues especially important for Least Developing Countries (LDC) and Net Food Importing Developing Countries (NFIDC), but also for other Developing Countries for which exports in these sectors are critical to their economies. Issues covered include the increasing food-import reliance of many developing countries, the growth of food imports and food import bills, special safeguard provisions and import surges and identifying special products for differential treatment in the trade agreement. The issues include those which concern exports, such as tariff escalation and tariff preferences, non-tariff trade barriers, as well as the importance of certain export products such as fruits and vegetables, cotton, a nd sugar. The fact sheets also outline special agricultural concerns in respect of trade-related intellectual property rights (TRIPS). Key words: tariff, tariff preferences, tariff escalation, import bills, non-tariff barriers, TRIPS, special safeguards, developing countries, Least Developed Countries, Net Food Importing Developing Countries, WTO, Doha Development Round, Cancun Ministerial, Sugar, Cotton, Fruits and Vegetables, agricultural trade.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    REVIEW OF BASIC FOOD POLICIES 2002 2003
    Also available in:

    This is the second issue of the Review of basic food policies, which covers policy developments in production, consumption marketing and trade of cereals, oilseeds and livestock products during the period 2001-2002. The policy information contained in the report is taken from country responses to FAO questionnaires and from publicly available sources. The period under review was marked by several significant developments, particularly the World Trade Organization (WTO) Doha Ministerial Agreement that launched a new round of multilateral trade negotiations. This Agreement has set in train discussions on agriculture that include a review of experience so far with the implementation of the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture (AOA). Thus it is hoped that the examination of agricultural policies that is contained in this and earlier versions of the Review might be of use to countries in their preparations for the negotiations on agriculture.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.