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Socio-economics of trawl fisheries










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    Book (series)
    Proceedings of the Second Meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee of the FAO Project Management of tuna fishing capacity: conservation and socio-economics Madrid (Spain), 15-18 March 2004 2005
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    The FAOs Japan-funded Project on the Management of tuna fishing capacity: conservation and socio-economics has been formulated by FAO with the objective of improving the management of tuna fisheries on a global scale. Its immediate objectives are to provide technical information necessary for the management of tuna fishing capacity and to identify and resolve the technical problems associated with that management on a global scale, taking into account conservation and socio-economic is sues. This publication presents results of the studies carried out by the Project that were proposed by the Project and considered by its Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) at its 1st Meeting (Rome, Italy, 14-16 April 2003) as being of highest priority. Earlier versions of papers on these studies were presented to the 2nd Meeting of the TAC (Madrid, Spain, 15-18 March 2004), where they were critically discussed. These papers were subsequently peer reviewed, revised and edited. The studies presented in this publication are on the tuna fisheries and resources, the characterization and estimation of fishing capacity, the tuna fishing industry and the management of tuna-fishing capacity. Their results are summarized in the Overview of this publication, and detailed information on them is presented in the following four sections associated with these subjects. The first section describes, on the global scale: the development of tuna fisheries since their inception , including (i) the evolution of vessels, fishing gear, navigation and fishing techniques and fishing grounds and (ii) the trends in tuna catches, the status of the tuna stocks and the tuna catch data available from the FAOs Fisheries Global Information System (FIGIS). The second section includes three papers on fishing capacity of industrial tuna purse seiners and longliners and on the importance of non-industrial tuna fisheries. The third section consists of one paper that qu alitatively and quantitatively assesses the influence of the tuna market (e.g. prices and imports) on tuna catches. The fourth section includes two papers that analyse past developments and future options for the management of fishing capacities of the purse-seine and longline fleets.
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    Project
    Studies on Mesh Selectivity And Performance Of The New Fish-Cum-Prawn Trawl at Pesalai, Sri Lanka - BOBP/MIS/04 1986
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    In 1984, the small-scale fisheries project of the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP) introduced a new design of prawn-cum-trawl net in Pesalai, Sri Lanka, to help augment the catches of finfish and shellfish in the region. As part of this pilot activity, the project also conducted a management study: to find out the optimum mesh size of the codend of the trawl. Toward this end, some experiments were conducted off Pesalai during April and July 1984. This paper discusses and analyzes the findings of t hese experiments. Three commercial prawn trawlers of the same class, and three fish-cum-prawn trawls of the same dimension and construction, were employed for the mesh selectivity experiments. A scientist from NARA (National Aquatic Resources Agency), Colombo, carried out the study, in cooperation with Mr. G. Pajot, BOBP Senior Fishing Technologist, and Dr. K. Sivasubramaniam, Senior Fisheries Biologist. The author thanks these two Scientists for their advice and help. He also thanks Mr. M.G.K . Gunawardane, Research Assistant, Mr. W.G. Sirisena, Lab Attendant, NARA, and Mr. M.J.M. Soosai, Gear Instructor, Ministry of Fisheries, Sri Lanka, for their assistance. He is grateful to Dr. S. Garcia of the FAO, Rome, for his comments on the paper. The small-scale fisheries project of the Bay of Bengal Programme is funded by SIDA (Swedish International Development Authority) and executed by the FAO (Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations). The project seeks to develop, demons trate and promote technologies and methodologies to improve the conditions of small-scale fisher-folk. The project covers five countries in the region - Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Thailand.
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    FIRMS-WECAFC Report of the Regional workshop on Recreational Fisheries Statistics in the Caribbean, The Commonwealth of the Bahamas, 20 - 22 June 2017
    The Commonwealth of the Bahamas, 20–22 June 2017
    2018
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    The WECAFC-FIRMS regional workshop on Recreational Fisheries Statistics in the Caribbean was supported by the Caribbean Billfish Project, which is a component of the GEF-funded, World Bank-implemented, Ocean Partnership for Sustainable Fisheries and Biodiversity Conservation Models for Innovation and Reform (ABNJ) Project, and is being executed by the WECAFC Secretariat at the Subregional Office for the Caribbean of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). The Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources of the Bahamas Government kindly hosted this workshop, which was held at the Bahamas Agricultural Industrial Corporation (BAIC). There is a need to develop recreational fisheries data collection and fishery statistics capacities in the Caribbean. Improving nations’ abilities to inform the sustainable management of valuable fish stocks, through robust data analyses, will yield socio-economic dividends for current and future citizens. The Caribbean Billfish Project seeks to improve regional recreational fishery data collection and analysis capacities in order to inform the ongoing improvements to the management of billfish and other stocks at national and regional levels. The workshop brought together 38 representatives from 13 Caribbean countries and overseas territories’ fisheries departments, regional fisheries bodies, fisheries technical advisory institutions, non-governmental organizations, various fishery statistics specialists and other relevant stakeholders. Participants’ knowledge of regional fishery data challenges and their capacities to address these challenges effectively were developed over the course of the workshop. Within the Caribbean, recreational fisheries currently represent a largely untapped resource for valuable data capture. This fishery subsector is very capable of providing invaluable data to genuinely inform effective fisheries management. However, national fishery authorities tend to either not recognize the opportunity, or struggle to engage effectively with this fishery sector for data capture. This workshop emphasized the opportunities at hand for citizen science, holistic fisheries data capture and management, and described effective data collection and analysis methodologies from other regions. Participants then prioritized the regional data collection needs collectively, from both recreational and artisanal fleets, and agreed on technicalities for digital data systems applications – including the use of SmartForms, a pilot version of which is expected to be implemented during the Caribbean Billfish Project.

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