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Impact on Seafood Safety of the Nuclear Accident in Japan

INFOSAN - 9 May 2011







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Data management and visualisation in response to large-scale nuclear emergencies affecting food and agriculture 2019
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    In a large-scale nuclear emergency affecting food and agriculture, the release of radionuclides to the environment can severely impact the food chain and human health. Up-to-date information of soil, water and crops are pertinent to informing decisions that prevent potentially contaminated products from reaching consumers. However, traditional management and visualisation of data are constrained in response times and decision-making accuracy as they are often not centralized and performed manually. Developments in information technology (IT) allow for Decision Support System (DSS) tools and algorithms to enhance real-time management of large volumes of data and decision-making in a spatio-temporal context. These IT support functions increase the capacity of stakeholders to focus on the most important matters at hand – ensuring food and consumer safety. This publication presents the challenges and solutions of real-time data management, geo-visualisation and decision making, as well as two case-studies of how innovative IT systems can assist in nuclear emergency response affecting food and agriculture. One of the case studies presented is by the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division; the other case study by Japanese Competent Authorities in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Nuclear Accidents and Radioactive Contamination of Foods
    INFOSAN - 30 March 2011
    2011
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    Radioactive isotopes of elements (radionuclides) are naturally present in the environment, and that includes our bodies and our food and water. We are exposed to radiation (also known as background radiation) from these radionuclides on a daily basis. Radiation comes from space (i.e., cosmic rays) as well as from naturally-occurring radioactive materials (radionuclides) found in the soil, water and air. Radioactivity can be detected in food and water and the concentration of naturally-occurring radionuclides varies depending on several factors such as local geology, climate and agricultural practices.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Risk assessment of Campylobacter spp. in broiler chickens and Vibrio spp. in seafood
    Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert - Consultation - Bangkok, Thailand 9 August 2002
    2003
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) convened an expert consultation on “Risk assessment of Campylobacter spp. In broiler chickens and Vibrio spp. in seafood” in the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (RAP), Bangkok, Thailand on 5 - 9 August 2002. The list of participants is presented in Annex 1. Mr Dong Qingsong, FAO Deputy Regional Representative for Asia and the Pacific and Officer-in-charge, RAP, opened the meetin g on behalf of the two sponsoring organizations. In welcoming the participants Mr Qingsong noted the increasing significance of microbiological hazards in relation to food safety. He noted that international trade had amplified the opportunity for these hazards to be disseminated from the original point of production to locations thousands of miles away, thereby permitting such food safety hazards to impact on public health and trade in more than one country. Mr Qingsong observed that this under lined the need to first consider microbiological hazards at the international level and provide the means by which they can then be addressed at regional and national levels. He highlighted the commitment of FAO and WHO to provide a neutral international forum to consider new approaches to achieving food safety, and in particular to address microbiological risk assessment.

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