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Raising community awareness through participatory video and mobile cinema









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    Booklet
    Applying MEV-CAM tools: participatory video 2024
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    The Making Every Voice Count for Adaptive Management (MEV-CAM) toolkit provides process documentation facilitators with instruments for documenting change through participatory video to generate knowledge, monitor impact, and share practices. This toolkit sheds light on how to develop a participatory video process in all its stages: beginning with stakeholder identification, activity planning, capturing of change, and more. The MEV-CAM initiative was launched in 2020 to empower and recognize local and Indigenous communities as true agents of change in the realms of sustainable dryland management, restoration, and South-South cooperation. Putting communities in the driver's seat, MEV-CAM uses participatory tools, such as video, which allows for the most significant impact to be visualized from the process of change itself. The MEV-CAM approach guarantees that stakeholders at different levels are engaged in the impact and processes of change with decision makers; learn not only from partners and facilitators, but also from other community members; and feel inspired to disseminate their knowledge and voice their needs to participate in sharing information. While drylands account for 44 percent of the world’s agricultural land, desertification has rapidly increased due to the consistent use of unsustainable land use practices. MEV-CAM values the knowledge that communities possess in combatting the anthropogenic effects of climate change and guides them in disseminating these skills – nationally, regionally, and globally. This toolkit highlights various case studies in which facilitators applied the participatory video process with Indigenous communities of their project’s targeted landscapes in Southern Africa, Central Asia, and the Middle East. The case studies elaborate on the facilitators’ experiences using the participatory tools, and particularly detail communities’ reactions to participating in the activities.
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    Document
    Training of trainers and capacity building for small-scale fisheries operators 2014
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    Cross-cutting most activities of the SmartFish Programme is the provision of training. The development of knowledge and skills of small-scale fishers, traders and processors, as well as extension workers and public sector staff, is a fundamental aspect of most interventions to improve standards, fish handling, management and ultimately improved business. Here we describe a training of Community Trainers approach that has been successfully used by the Programme. Previous capacity building in the region has produced a range of training materials and a number of lessons learned. It was important to understand these previous initiatives. Historically a great deal of attention has been given to strengthening the traditional government extension services to deliver training to small-scale fisheries stakeholders. For reasons such as lack of resources and lack of motivation amongst extension agents, this model has rarely worked and hence the knowledge and skills don’t reach those who require t hem.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Participatory Video in agrifood systems and digital environments
    Modular training
    2023
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    Participatory Video can be used as an interactive tool to promote more inclusive and sustainable forms of development mirroring local realities and sharing people’s values, cultures, and perceptions. Participatory Video production and sharing are part of a Communication for development process, grounded on a rural appraisal aimed at identifying communication problems and needs of the intended audience. Within this framework, video can play a significant role in sharing relevant information and knowledge among peers and while reaching out to interest groups through digital environments, such as mobile phones, social media and ICTs. Several rural institutions and farmers’ organizations require enhancing their capacity to use Participatory Video in a systematic way as part of inclusive rural communication services. In collaboration with the Digital Green and the College of Development Communication of the University of Los Baños in the Philippines, FAO has developed a modular training and is currently organizing series of trainings on Participatory Video. The intention is to assist extension services, farmers’ organizations, development institutions and programmes in adopting Participatory Video in fields like family farming and sustainable agri-food systems.

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