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FAO Investment Centre Environmental Report Series N. 1

Kenya: Aberdares Natural Resources Development Project, Environmental Impact Assessment Report, FAO Investment Centre-African Development Bank, 1997








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    Document
    FAO Investment Centre Environmental Report Series N. 2
    Incentive Systems for Natural Resources Management: Role of Indirect Incentives, FAO Investment Centre-IFAD, 1999
    1999
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    FAO Investment Centre environmental reports are directed to environment and natural resources specialists. They address environmental issues associated with the formulation of investment projects for the agricultural/rural sector.This report reviews the role of indirect incentives in relation to incentive systems that promote participation in resource conservation to reduce male and youth migration from rural communities. Beyond short- and medium-term incentives, there is a need for longer-term incentives that relate to security of access to and control of resources. The study examines indirect incentives which comprise those influences on producers’ decisions that are not concerned with directly bringing about changes in the management of natural resources through financial or similar inducements (direct incentives). The study also addresses the variability of incentive systems used by different developers and the need for greater harmonization in approach.
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    Mid-term Evaluation of the UNEP/FAO/GEF Project Land Degradation Assessment in Drylands (LADA) 2009
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    The project “Land Degradation Assessment in Drylands (LADA)” is a global initiative with several actors involved in the implementation. The project involves UNEP as the implementing agency, FAO as the executing agency, international organizations, universities, research centres and six countries through their national institutions: Argentina, China, Cuba, Senegal, South Africa and Tunisia. The project has a total budget of US$ 16.58M that is financed by a GEF contribution of US$ 7.725M and by co -financing commitments of US$ 7.98M. The project was approved by GEF on December 29, 2005, started on May 1, 2006 and the expected completion date is May 2010. The project strategy is to help to overcome current policy and institutional barriers to sustainable land use in dryland zones that are occasioned by the lack of quality information on the extent and severity of dryland degradation. The project has two principal objectives: (i) develop and implement strategies, methods and tools to ass ess, quantify and analyse the nature, extent, severity and impacts of land degradation on ecosystems, watersheds and river basins, and carbon storage in drylands at a range of spatial and temporal scales; and (ii) build national, regional and global assessment capacities to enable the design, planning and implementation of interventions to mitigate land degradation and establish sustainable land use and management practices. These two objectives will be realized through the following four expect ed outcomes: (1) an improved needs-based and process-driven approach to drylands degradation assessment tested and disseminated; (2) a map with information retrieved from the global/regional land degradation assessment in drylands, which will constitute a baseline of the status of land degradation in drylands, with a special emphasis on areas at greatest risk; (3) detailed local assessments and analysis of land degradation and its impact in the pilot countries; and (4) A proposed global action p lan, incorporating main findings from the project, conclusions and recommendations for further action. This Mid-Term Evaluation (MTE) has been initiated by UNEP Evaluation and Oversight Unit (EOU) in cooperation with the Evaluation Service of FAO (PBEE). The objective of the evaluation was to assess operational aspects, such as project management and implementation of activities and also the level of progress towards the achievement of objectives. It provides an in-depth reflection of project progress, priority actions for the last phase of the project and recommendations for the remaining period of the project and other future similar initiatives. This MTE is based on a desk review of project documents and on interviews with key project informants and project staffs including a one-week mission to Mendoza, Argentina to participate in a LADA training workshop and one-week in Rome, Italy and Tunis, Tunisia. The methodology included the development of an evaluation matrix to guide the entire data gathering and analysis process. The findings were triangulated with the use of multiple sources of information when possible. The evaluation report is structured around the GEF five evaluation criteria: Relevance, Effectiveness, Efficiency, Results/Impacts and Sustainability.
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    Assessment of Forest Resource Degradation and Intervention Options in Refugee-Hosting Areas of Western and Southwestern Uganda 2020
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    Uganda is currently hosting over 1.3 million refugees making it the largest refugee host country in Africa. The inflow of refugees is reported to have exacerbated a range of ongoing environmental impacts and associated challenges, including land degradation and woodland loss, resulting in inadequate access to energy for cooking and competition with local people for water and other natural resources. Supporting more sustainable use of those resources, especially forests and other woodlands, could help address environmental degradation and improve energy access. Building on a 2018 assessment of natural resource degradation in the refugee-hosting areas of northern Uganda, FAO, in collaboration with the World Bank and the Government of Uganda, has undertaken a follow-on assessment of forest resource degradation in the refugee hosting areas in the west and southwest of the country. The study identifies potential intervention options to mitigate pressure on forest resources, restore degraded land, enhance sustainable woodfuel supply and contribute to resilience-building of both the displaced and host communities. The findings of this study will add to the evidence base for the World Bank/Government of Uganda (GoU) investment package ‘Investing in Forests and Protected Areas for Climate-smart Development project’, to be supported under the Refugee Sub-Window of the International Development Association’s 18th and 19th funding rounds. It is envisaged that the study findings will also guide the support of different development partners for programming energy and environment interventions in the forced displacement context.

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