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Support for the Management of The Fall Armyworm in Zimbabwe -TCP/ZIM/3605









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    Building Surveillance and Management Capacity to Effectively Respond to Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Tanzania - TCP/URT/3608 2021
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    Fall Armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda is an insect pest that feeds on more than 80 crop species, causing damage to such economically important crops as maize, rice, sorghum, paddy, legumes, vegetables and cotton, and leading to significant yield loss The United Republic of Tanzania is a leading producer of maize in East Africa region and the tenth producer in the world An estimated 6 59 million tonnes of maize are grown in the country each year by 4 5 million farm households, representing about 42 percent of Tanzanian farmers Primary outbreaks of FAW have been reported in Rukwa Kagera Pwani Geita Simiyu Mwanza, Morogoro Kilimanjaro and Njombe regions, with the Southern Highlands, the breadbasket of the country, and Southern regions also at high risk Because of the nature of FAW infestation, it is likely that the pest will colonize most African countries and have a negative impact on both food security and livelihoods.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Guidance note: Addressing the impact of COVID-19 on the Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control 2020
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    Fall armyworm (FAW) is a polyphagous, transboundary pest that has spread across more than 100 countries in less than four years, beyond its native territory in the tropical and subtropical Americas (see Figure 1). Once FAW finds favourable conditions for reproduction, it establishes itself with no possibility of eradication. It feeds and reproduces on suitable host crops such as maize, sorghum, millet and many other plants. FAW devastates crops and considerably reduces crop yields if it is not well controlled; thus, it represents a significant threat to food security and the livelihoods of millions of farmers. In response, in December 2019, FAO launched a bold, transformative and coordinated Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control, which aims to reduce yield losses caused by the pest by strengthening national capacities for sustainable management of FAW. Concurrently, a global pandemic has emerged in the shape of COVID-19, which is caused by a transboundary and highly contagious virus that undermines human health by attacking the respiratory system and, in the worse cases, provoking pneumonia. This guidance note highlights the impact that COVID-19 will have on the Global Action for Fall Armyworm Control, and thus the sustainable management of fall armyworm with an aim to achieve SDG2, Zero Hunger.
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    Support to Enhance National Capacity for the Management of Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Uganda - TCP/UGA/3605 2020
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    Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda, J.E Smith) is a pest of maize and other crops that has recently become an invasive species in West, Central and Southern Africa, with outbreaks being recorded for the first time in 2016. In Uganda, MAAIF first received reports of an unknown pest on 40 percent of maize crops in three districts in July 2016. Identified as FAW by the National Agriculture Research Organization (NARO), by August 2017 the pest had been reported in all 115 districts of Uganda. Given the importance of crop production to household food and nutrition security, the spread of the pest is a major concern in the country, where maize is the third most important food crop in terms of production, with 4 million tonnes produced by about 3.6 million farmers. Concerted efforts are required to reduce the impact of FAW on maize production in the country in order to ensure food and nutrition security and better livelihoods. The project was designed to contribute to protecting the livelihoods and food security of populations living in FAW-affected areas and to develop the capacities of the main stakeholders in the surveillance, monitoring and management of FAW.

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