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Uganda – Food security and livelihoods in areas affected by desert locusts, September 2020

Assessment report










FAO. 2021. Uganda – Food security and livelihoods in areas affected by desert locusts, September 2020. Assessment report. Rome.




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    West Africa | Desert locust crisis appeal, May–December 2020
    Anticipatory action and rapid response
    2020
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    Recent forecasts by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have indicated a risk of locust invasion in West Africa from June 2020. From East Africa, some swarms could reach the eastern part of the Sahel and continue westwards from Chad to Mauritania. Surveillance and control teams will be mobilized across the region with a focus on Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and the Niger, and extended to Senegal. Countries such as Cameroon, the Gambia and Nigeria are also on watch in the event that desert locust spreads to these highly acute food-insecure countries. Since the region could be threatened in the coming months, FAO is strongly encouraging no regret investments in preparedness and anticipatory action to control swarms and safeguard livelihoods, given already high levels of acute food insecurity. Therefore, cost estimates for preparedness, anticipatory action and rapid response have been assessed. FAO’s Commission for Controlling the Desert Locust in the Western Region and FAO’s subregional resilience team for West Africa and the Sahel are already working together with potentially affected countries for the implementation of anticipatory actions, such as training, pre-positioning of resources, initiating surveillance activities and control operations. The countries of the subregion most exposed to the threat of a locust invasion are Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, the Niger and Senegal. All of these countries are already facing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which presents significant further risks to food security. Applying lessons from the 2003–2005 desert locust upsurge in West Africa and from the implementation of resilience programmes in the region, including its Early Warning Early Action approach, FAO is focusing on anticipatory action to avert a full blown food crisis, mainly by: scaling up support to governments to monitor and control the pest; and safeguarding livelihood interventions.
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    GIEWS Special Report - Uganda, 18 January 2008 2008
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    Excessive rains in the period July-September 2007 caused extensive flooding in certain areas of Uganda, particularly in Amuria and Katakwi Districts of Teso sub-region, where crop losses, both pre- and post-harvest, were very high. An FAO/WFP mission assessed the food security conditions in the worst affected areas of Teso, Lango, Karamoja, and Acholi sub-regions . It found that there is a looming food crisis in Katakwi and Amuria Districts and in parts of neighbouring ones, which requires immediate action to avert impending human suffering and possible loss of life. Food prices in some rural markets are rising fast and are double their levels a year ago. The mission noted that 312 118 people in the worst affected sub counties in Teso, Lango and Karamoja received a one-month food ration during September-November 2007...
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    Project
    Emergency Preparedness and Response to Desert Locust Infestation in Uganda - TCP/UGA/3801 2022
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    Because of its high mobility and wide and varied feeding habits, the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria is a dreaded insect that can, each day, eat its own weight in fresh food, form dense mobile swarms and travel up to 150 km Desert locust swarms reportedly migrated from Yemen to Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia between December 2019 and January 2020 prompting FAO operated early warning system desert locust information services ( to issue alerts about a potential spread to South Sudan and Uganda Heavy rains in the Horn of Africa in December 2019 created favorable breeding conditions with the potential to last until June 2020 possibly resulting in large numbers of swarms Swarms spread quickly and at an alarming rate Various sized desert locust swarms entered Kenya and a 40 km by 60 km swam was observed entering Kenya from Somalia in 2020 Uganda has not experienced a desert locust invasion since the early 1960 s, when it had devastating effects on the country's food security situation However, FAO had at the time identified a low to moderate risk of desert locust swarms entering Uganda With limited control capacity in Kenya, the risk that some swarms would spread into the north and north eastern parts of Uganda was considered, particularly in the Kenya bordering subregion of Karamoja With a looming invasion threat, Ugandan government officials analysed the country's preparedness in the event of an infestation and drafted a contingency plan Recognizing the lack of knowledge about this pest and the low capacity for surveillance and control in the country, there was an urgent need to mobilize and educate national and local institutions, as well as the general public, to conduct surveillance and reporting, and prepare for control operations.

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