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Burundi | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)











​FAO. 2020. Burundi | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020): Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Rome.



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    Haiti | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    During the past ten years, Haiti has been hit by multiple earthquakes and hurricanes, as well as a series of droughts linked to the El Niño phenomenon, irregular distribution of rainfall and floods while still facing cholera, diphtheria, malaria, a migration crisis and recurrent protection issues. These factors have caused widespread damage to crop, livestock and fish production, and to rural infrastructure, severely affecting the livelihoods of vulnerable households. Political instability, sharp inflation, the depreciation of the national currency and underlying poverty have also fuelled socio-political unrest over the last few years. Following confirmation of the first COVID-19 case on 19 March 2020, the Government declared a state of emergency, which has been prolonged until July 2020, and adopted essential containment measures to prevent the spread of the virus, including the closure of factories, schools, airports and ports, banning of meetings of more than ten people, night curfew, prohibition of informal street selling and reduced opening hours of public markets. The pandemic has further exacerbated the situation in an already fragile context, mainly causing: reduced availability of and access to food products, particularly due to the closure of the border with the Dominican Republic; increased food prices, including for staple foods such as beans, rice, sugar and vegetable oil; the slowdown/closure of economic activities; and market disruptions. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has therefore revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable populations.
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    Chad | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    In Chad, recurrent climatic shocks and conflict are exacerbating people’s food insecurity, particularly in the Lake Chad Basin, where there are nearly 300 000 displaced people. In addition, the country hosts a large number of refugees from the Central African Republic and the Sudan. Despite good cereal production from the 2019/20 agricultural season, a 42-percent fodder deficit was registered in the Sahel region, significantly affecting feed availability for pastoralists’ during the dry season. Furthermore, drought, irregular rainfall and increased insecurity are preventing herders from access grazing land. Livestock mortality rates have al o been increasing during this year’s pastoral lean season. Following confirmed COVID-19 cases, the Government put in place a series of urgent and essential health-related mitigation measures, including the lockdown of all the main cities, movement restrictions and border closures. These are indirectly affecting the supply chain, limiting imports and disrupting markets, which is adding pressure on conflict-affected areas – Lake Chad Basin and Tibesti – where 40 percent of the population is experiencing difficulties in accessing markets. In addition, the prices of millet – one of Chad’s most important subsistence crops – has sharply increased, by 37 percent between April 2019 and April 2020. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
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    Yemen | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    Over half of Yemen’s population is facing severe hunger and malnutrition rates are soaring. For over five years, armed conflict has been the main driver of food insecurity. The country’s collapsing economy, import restrictions and ongoing insecurity are driving food prices up, proving devastating for a population that heavily relies on imports for its staple foods. Even before COVID-19, agriculture, Yemen’s main economic sector, has been crippled by the compounding effects of displacements; disease outbreaks (including cholera); and natural hazards (including widespread flooding since mid-April). The presence of plant pests, such as fall armyworm and desert locusts, are further endangering agricultural livelihoods. On 10 April 2020, Yemen confirmed its first case of COVID-19. Since then, the number of cases has been rapidly increasing in various governorates. Urgent and essential containment measures have included the imposing of a partial overnight curfew in major cities, closing of workplaces and schools, international travel controls, increased screening and quarantine at ports and internal movement restrictions. In a country already facing the world’s largest humanitarian crisis, the spread of COVID-19 could have dire consequences not only on the already overwhelmed health system, but also on food security and agricultural livelihoods. Access to the most vulnerable beneficiaries, which was already difficult prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, is proving to be a serious challenge in 2020. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.

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