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Recommendation from the participants at the side meeting on tropical secondary forests at the XIth World Forestry Congress, Antalya, Turkey







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Towards Sustainable Management and Development of Tropical Secondary Forests in Anglophone Africa: The Nairobi Proposal for Action 2003
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    Secondary forests - defined as forests which have developed after significant disturbance (see chapter II) - are increasingly prominent features in tropical landscapes, and in many countries the surface area covered by them is far greater than that of primary forests. In Africa there may be as much as 90 million to 313.3 million ha of secondary forest, depending on the definition used. This represents between 6.4 % and 22.3 % of the world's tropical forest. Secondary forests provide a variety of products and services that can contribute to improving socio-economic conditions particularly in rural areas, watershed protection, combating soil run-off and erosion, and commercial timber and NWFP production. If secondary forests are managed well they may - under favourable framework conditions - relieve the pressure on remaining primary forests, thereby effectively conserving biodiversity and genetic resources. More recently, the potential of this resource to sequester carbon from the atmosp here has become an important topic, and is discussed at international fora around the world. In order to realize the potential of secondary forests we need to manage them in a sustainable manner. Unfortunately the management of this resource has received insufficient attention at local, national and international levels. More focus is needed on the socio-economic factors responsible for secondary forest formation, the interactions of secondary forests with other land-use types (farmers' crop and livestock production systems), and the environmental benefits this resource can provide. Particularly the translation to well formulated policies backed by adequate legal regulations and a supportive institutional framework is needed. It is within this context that a series of regional workshops (Tropical America, Asia and Africa) were developed.
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    Article
    Assessing land use and cover change, forest degradation and secondary forest databases for better understand of airborne CO2 measurements over the Brazilian Amazon
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Tropical forests are essential for ecosystem services provision and for climate change mitigation. Amazon forest, the largest continue tropical forests in the world, have been decreasing due to deforestation and forest degradation. Brazil, a country containing most of the Amazon forests, also presents the highest deforestation rates within the Pan-Amazonian countries. The CARBAM project has been collecting bimonthly CO2 atmospheric measurements from an airplane since 2010 in the Brazilian Amazon, showing that there is a reduction on the forest capacity to absorb carbon for deforestation and climate change patterns. To understand these CO2 fluxes, we need to analyze the land use and cover change processes including forest degradation and secondary forest growth. Our goal is to assess different databases to better understand deforestation, degradation and secondary forest dynamics in the Amazon. For this, we merged different databases for the period 2010-2018: MapBiomas for land use and cover change; PRODES for deforestation; Bullock et al. (2020) for degradation; and Silva et al. (2020) for secondary forest. We found that, from the total accumulated deforested area in 2018 (17% of the Brazilian Amazon), pasture represent 69% fallowed by secondary vegetation 21% and agriculture 8%. The annual deforested area, smaller than secondary vegetation area, is increasing since 2012. Degradation has a different area each year. The carbon uptake by secondary forest and degradation dynamics is underestimated in the national communications of greenhouse gases, and its mapping is extremely relevant to policy makers to accomplish the National Determined Contribution. The large pasture areas deserve attention because it may permit the secondary forest to increase and provide agriculture expansion areas, decreasing in this way the pressure for deforestation and degradation of primary forest and contributing to preserve biodiversity and ecosystem services of the Amazon forests. Keywords: Amazon forests, deforestation, degradation, secondary forests, CO2 emissions ID: 3623188
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Factors Affecting Productivity of Tropical Forest Plantations: Acacia, Eucalypt, Teak, Pine
    GLOBAL FIBRE SUPPLY STUDY - Working Paper Series
    1997
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    Gains from a good tree improvement program (starting with species/provenance matching to site) can usually result in considerable gain in wood yields from tropical forest plantations. Optimal nursery and silvicultural practices (including seed pre-treatment, application of nitrogen-fixing soil micro-organisms, optimal spacing for defined end use, selection of adequate site, fertilization, and irrigation) can considerably increase such gains further. This report summarizes literature on gains tha t might be expected by implementing tree improvements and optimal silvicultural practices for acacias, eucalypts, teak and pines in tropical areas. Results are presented for each genus in turn, first examining factors common to all the genera, and then focusing on unique factors. The data on tree-growth gains are extremely variable from study to study. They range from virtually no favourable response to tree improvement and optimal silviculture, to gains of many hundreds of percent over c ontrols. This of course complicates the matter of using such data in global fibre supply modelling.

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