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BIOMASS - Assessment of the status of the development of the standards for the terrestrial essential climate variables

Global Terrestrial Observing System GTOS 67










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    Multiple uses of forest biomass as nature-based solution in order to increase the share of green and renewable energy at the energy matrix of several industries
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    The Brazilian Tree Industry (Ibá) is the association responsible for institutionally representing the planted tree production chain with its main stakeholders. Ibá represents 50 companies and 9 state entities for products originating from planted trees, most notably wood panels, laminate flooring, pulp, paper, charcoal steel industry and biomass, as well as independent producers and financial investors which together contribute with 7% of Brazil’s industrial Gross Domestic Product.
    The sector holds 9 million hectares of planted trees and 5.9 million hectares for conservation. The total forest area removes carbon from the atmosphere and stores the carbon into six carbon pools with the potential of storing 4,48 bi TCO2e.
    Forest biomass also plays an important role of avoiding carbon emission to the atmosphere when used in industry. By investing in circular bioeconomy this industry has transformed a residue from pulp mills into a source of renewable bioenergy - the black liquor, which represents 69% of the total energy needed by the sector. Adding 20% of forest biomass chip and shavings, the energy matrix of this sector reaches 89% of renewability. Additionally, Brazil is the global leader of charcoal production (12%). 1.8 ton CO2eq is avoided for each ton of pig iron. Such contribution has gained attention from ENDP and GEF, both organizations support an initiative called Sustainable Steelmaking Project - unique from Brazil and that has significant importance in social, environmental and economic aspects. The charcoal industry may also be able to increase energy production by using the gases from pyrolysis through a cogeneration process. Looking at the future, the sector has been investing in innovation to, in the mid-long term, offer bio-oils and 2nd generation ethanol which may contribute mostly for transportation industry – road and aviation. The forest carbon has an innate role at circular economy and provides renewable services and products, especially bioenergy. Keywords: Climate change, Value chain, Innovation ID: 3487071
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    Book (stand-alone)
    T 13 Assessment of the status of the development of standards for the terrestrial essential climate variables
    GTOS 68 - Fire disturbance
    2009
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    Fire is an important ecosystem disturbance with varying return frequencies, resulting in land cover alteration and change, and atmospheric emissions on multiple time scales. Fire is also an important land management practice and is an important natural abiotic agent in fire dependent ecosystems. Fires not only affect above-ground biomass but also surface and below-ground organic matter such as peat. Information on fire activity is used for global change research, estimating atm ospheric emissions and developing periodic global and regional assessments. It is also used for fire and ecosystem management planning and operational purposes (fire use, preparedness and wildfire suppression) and development of informed policies. The Fire Disturbance Essential Climate Variable includes Burned Area as the primary variable and two supplementary variables: Active Fire and Fire Radiated Power (or Fire Radiative Power - FRP). Burned Area is defined as the area af fected by human-made or natural fire and is expressed in units of area such as hectare (ha) or square kilometre (km2). Active Fire is the location of burning at the time of the observation and is expressed in spatial coordinates or by an indicator of presence of absence of fire in a spatially explicit digital raster map, such as a satellite image. FRP is the rate of emitted radiative energy by the fire at the time of the observation and is expressed in units of power, such as W atts (W).
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    Planting design, survival and blue carbon stock of mangrove plantations in Banacon Island, Philippines
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Mangrove forests have the capacity to store and sequester vast amount of atmospheric carbon. Coastal reforestation in the tropics became more popular because of this ecosystem service and their value to protect human from the impacts of tsunami and storm surge. To illustrate mangrove’s blue carbon potential in view of planting design, carbon stock assessment of 20-year old Rhizophora stylosa plantations was done. Tree and sediment carbon stocks were determined using standard nested plot technique. These parameters were further examined in terms of the plant spacing used during the plantation establishment, namely: 0.5m x 0.5m; and 1.0m x 1.0m. Key findings showed that plantations that were established with closer spacing i.e. 0.5m x 0.5m spacing have higher stand density values than those with 1.0m x 1.0m interval by about 23,900 trees ha-1. Survival rate was also significantly higher in the former than the latter with a mean difference of 23%. In view of total carbon stocks, 0.5m x 0.5m spaced stands contain 276.8±11.6 tC ha-1, of which sediment has contributed about 110.1 tC ha-1 (40%). On the other hand, stands of 1.0m x 1.0m spacing have only 157.6±40.1 tC ha-1, wherein 21.3 tC ha-1 (48.2%) is attributable to sediments. Overall findings suggested that planting at a closer spacing (0.5m distance) could produce larger sediment carbon stock. A significant mean difference of 88.80 tC ha-1 was computed in favor of 0.5m x 0.5m stand, which is indicative of two possible reasons: a) thicker vegetation provides larger source organic material through litterfall; b) more interlinked roots help stabilize sediment from erosion while effectively trapping more organic material from other sources during tidal movements. ID: 3477110

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