Thumbnail Image

Manual of fertilizer distribution









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Case studies on policies and strategies for sustainable soil fertility and fertilizer management in South Asia 2011
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    According to FAO's latest estimates, global food production needs to increase by 70 percent by 2050 to feed an additional 2.3 billion people. Projections indicate that about 80 percent of the gains in production will need to come from increased yield growth and cropping intensity on existing farmlands. Nutrient depletion of soils is a key constraint to boosting the productivity of small and marginal farmers in Asia and the Pacific, who are among the most food-insecure. Efficient fertilizer use i s vital to reversing this trend. Most soil fertility depletion is caused when disposable household income is too low for farmers to advance from low-input/low-output farming, resulting in nutrient mining. Serious efforts are required at national and regional levels to develop appropriate policies, technologies and capacities to address this challenge. Policies must ensure that soil fertility is not depleted in low-input systems while also helping to curb overuse of fertilizers that, in some case s, leads to serious damage to ecosystems. As part of FAO's mandate to develop a knowledge base in support of food security and rural livelihoods, the Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific commissioned national studies on fertilizer use in South Asia, which has the largest incidence of food insecurity in the region. The studies aim to identify gaps in prevailing strategies and policies, and make recommendations for improvement. This book contains four case studies from Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakis tan and Sri Lanka, and a chapter on guidelines for fertilizer demand assessment and forecasting.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Tackling Food Insecurity in Pakistan through Strengthening of Soil Health Monitoring and Soil Fertility - GCP/PAK/143/USA 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Land in Pakistan is highly fragmented. The number of small farms, of which 40 percent have an area of less than 1 ha, has increased considerably in recent years and now accounts for 8 percent of all cultivated land. There is a need to help farmers to ensure affordable access to inputs and reduce overall costs of production, while implementing Good Agriculture Practices. This will lead to a sustainable increase in production, sufficient and diversified food for subsistence, improved household income and an overall reduction in food insecurity. By using the principle of the Right fertilizer at the Right rate at the Right time in the Right place, or “4Rs”, and specifically Nutrient Stewardship, farmers can enhance yield and decrease expenses through reduced but balanced amounts of fertilizers that should be determined through soil testing. This also has benefits in terms of soil quality preservation. While the Government of Pakistan has prioritized a number of initiatives for smallholder farmers to improve their self-sufficiency in food production in the past, education and key messages on innovative knowledge products and farmer focused policies specifically regarding fertilizers and the management of problematic soils have not been promoted systematically. This project provided an opportunity for small and progressive growers to learn how to enhance crop production by managing soil fertility through the application of the 4Rs in two Provinces.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Fertilizer distribution and credit schemes for small-scale farmers 1979
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    More than 18 years experience in the FAO Fertilizer Programme on fertilizer use development under different local farming conditions in more than 40 developing countries has provided a wealth of information. It reveals not only the yield increasing effects of judicious fertilizer use, but also the constraints to this use, at the national, regional and farmer level. At the farmer level the constraints comprise: the farmers' lack of knowledge of modern techniques; ineffectiveness of extension serv ices, insufficient credit facilities, inadequate fertilizer supply, distribution and storage; and restricted possibilities for marketing farm products.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.