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Fostering Sustainability and Resilience for Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa - GCP/RAF/511/IFA








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    Lessons Learned on Diversification Experiences in the Special Programmes for Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa 2011
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    This study aims to learn from short-cycle animal husbandry experiences within the framework of the Special Programme for Food Security (SPFS) implemented in sub-Saharan Africa in order to disseminate good practices through new initiatives, for example: the National Programme for Food Security (NPFS); the Regional Programme for Food Security (RPFS); agricultural development projects; and the implementation of new policies on livestock breeding. Furthermore, the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) includes national and regional agricultural investment projects comprising livestock. With specific reference to the “diversification” subcomponent of the SPFS, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has more than 10 years’ experience in setting up and monitoring semi-intensive breeding units at different levels based on the concept of sustainability and replicability; it has moved on from approaches that failed to ac hieve technical progress in traditional breeding in Africa. In the diversification component, the following short-cycle domestic species have been bred in semi-intensive units: small ruminants and poultry (chickens, ducks and guinea fowl). This innovative methodology has attracted the attention of various national and international donors who have provided considerable support. This study assesses activities carried out in 11 countries of Central and West Africa: Mali, Chad, Niger, Burkina Faso, Togo, Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, Burundi, Central African Republic and Senegal. The projects are assessed to make a comparative analysis of the technological options adopted (in terms of production, feeding and marketing). Lessons have been learned and best practices identified; the advantages and disadvantages of different techniques in the light of the results obtained with local populations (in particular, women and youth organizations in the rural and urban communities) are analysed.
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    Final Report of the Regional Meeting on Agroecology in sub-Saharan Africa 2016
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    The Multistakeholder Consultation on agroecology for sub-Saharan Africa was held in Dakar, Senegal on 5-6 November 2015. Agroecology was presented as a solution to harness Africa’s social, natural and economic assets as it enhances local biodiversity and the conservation of natural resources. It also represents a paradigm shift in the way agriculture has been practised and analysed by proponent of mainstream science for over a century with an essentially reductionist approach and an increasing d ependence on external inputs. A significant part of conversations around food security and climate change has focused on production and productivity to meet present and future needs. While this can make important contributions to solving these problems, a further observation points out that public goods like social development and innovation are strong—and perhaps the strongest—levers for increasing food security. It was recognized that this requires a dramatic shift, starting with understanding the current conditions and incentivizing the systems that employ the best solutions: building the soil as a living organism; managing pests through natural practices and with increased biodiversity; and focusing on knowledge development and community empowerment at the local level. It was highlighted that food producers were the backbone of these local innovation systems, integrating local and scientific knowledge.

    Read the reports and other materials from other Meetings on Agroecology for Food Security and Nutrition :

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    Booklet
    Why the gender transformative approach is critical to achieving more equitable and resilient small-scale fisheries in sub-Saharan Africa 2023
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    This issue brief aims to highlight the benefits of adopting the gender transformative approach (GTA) in small-scale fisheries (SSF) projects and initiatives in sub-Saharan Africa. It serves as an introduction for various stakeholders wishing to gain an initial understanding of how to embed the GTA in fisheries programming. In sub-Saharan Africa, the SSF sector provides nutritious food for local, national, and international markets and underpins local economies in local communities. The SSF sector also provides income and livelihood support to millions, accounting for over 7.5 million men and 2.3 million women. Women are key players in the sector, however, they face major challenges in accessing natural and financial resources, capacity-building, and decision-making arenas at various levels, undermining their access to lucrative business opportunities. The GTA encourages SSF projects, programmes and interventions to foster a different mindset by targeting the root causes of gender inequality and assessing gender dynamics and power relations that perpetuate imbalances such as access to fisheries resources, food security and nutrition, capacity development, decision-making and access to finances and mobility. The gender transformative approach can be put into practice through a suite of different gender transformative methodologies. These include participatory approaches, methods and tools that encourage critical reflection and examination among women and men of gender roles and norms and power dynamics. Adopting the gender transformative approach ultimately contributes to advancing FAO’s commitment towards better production, better nutrition, better environment, and a better life.

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